Academic Catalog

2019-2020 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

Communication Studies and Theatre

App View

Majors

Communication, Technology and Culture Major

Theatre Major

Minors

Communication Studies Minor

Theatre Minor

Teacher Licensure

Endorsement in Theatre Arts (PreK–12)

The Department of Communication Studies and Theatre offers students the opportunity to study human communication practices in a variety of contexts. The department offers two majors—in communication, technology and culture and in theatre—and two minors—in communication studies and theatre—that each balance theoretical understanding with practical skills. The communication, technology and culture major focuses on ways in which ever-changing technological advances are impacting communication practices. The program provides a strong theoretical understanding of communication processes in a technology-based culture, including practical training that will allow students to become effective media practitioners. Courses examine both practical and theoretical approaches to the study of communication such as historical developments, policy implications, the influence of mass media and communication technologies, interpersonal relationships, and connections between communication and power relationships.
 
Students will learn how the methods of social science help us adapt messages across a variety of rhetorical situations. Communication courses are taught in an interactive manner combining lectures, discussion, in-class activities and hands-on experience. Students conduct theoretical and field research, write various types of academic and professional papers, design public relations campaigns, create blogs and deliver public presentations. In addition to working on their own, students in communication courses work in collaboration with other students gaining valuable teamwork skills.
 
Students majoring in communication, technology and culture are prepared for careers in a diverse group of occupations, such as public relations, advertising, sales, management, journalism and human resources. The major also helps prepare students for graduate studies.
 
The theatre major incorporates both theoretical and practical application of theatrical study and theatrical practice. The major in theatre seeks to foster a sense of wonder and excitement in students and community members, while continually asking: what is the role of the theatre and theatre artist in society, whether it be campus, a city, the nation, or the world? A fundamental keystone is that lessons learned in the classroom and on the stage have application in the “real world”. Students learn how to take ideas and realize them through application of theatrical production and presentation. As an interdisciplinary field of study, the theatre major draws from many sources and disciplines and seeks to highlight how they can inform each other, along with a vigorous schedule of productions that put theory into practice.

Communication, Technology and Culture Major

Degree Type Offered: B.S. Major

Consists of a minimum of 48 credit hours:

Required Courses

21 credit hours consisting of the following courses:

COMM-230 Communication Technologies: History, Culture, and Society

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An introduction to the history and influence of communication technology in society. The class will explore the various social, political, cultural, and economic impacts of new communication technology. Major topics include: the origins of writing, printing, photography, film, the telegraph and telephone, radio, television, and the internet.

COMM-240 Contemporary Media Industries

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines how electronic media industries have changed the way we produce and consume media products. The course will examine how the digital age has impacted notions of interactivity, virtual space, media production, networks and credibility. Particular attention will be paid to the social, economic and political implications of these changes.

COMM/PWR-255W Introduction to News Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Teaches students the basic skills of researching, investigating and writing in a variety of formats. Emphasis on identification of the writing structures used by contemporary media writers and utilization of these structures in original pieces researched and written by the students. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as PWR-255W)

COMM-327 Interpersonal Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines issues related to communication within personal and professional relationships. Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of verbal and nonverbal communication, the role of technology in interpersonal communication and how interpersonal communication functions to develop, negotiate, maintain and terminate relationships.

COMM-347 Strategic Public Relations

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course will cover strategic planning and specialized public relations issues. Issues include risks, crisis management, social marketing campaigns, and corporate and non-profit communication. Students will learn and apply advanced public relations theories and skills to case studies and real-life situations. Prerequisites: COMM/PWR-255W and one of the following courses ART-322, ART-323, ART-344, ART-347

-or-

COMM/PWR-305 Multimedia Reporting and Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Builds on the skills-oriented approach of COMM/PWR-255W by putting theory behind the practice of writing. Through individual and group writing projects, students work toward understanding the increasingly complex definition of news, its blurring line with entertainment, and the dynamic interplay between technologies and audiences. Prerequisite: COMM/PWR-255W or permission of instructor Offered alternate years: 2020-2021 (Cross-listed as PWR-305)

COMM-350 Research Methods in Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces quantitative and qualitative research methods used in the study of communication. Students learn to critically evaluate published research studies and how to conduct original research. The course will provide specific instruction and practice in survey writing and interviewing. Prerequisite: 6 credits in COMM (not including COMM-100) Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

COMM-400 Applied Communication Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

This capstone course explores practical applications of communication theory. Emphasis will be placed on the process of writing and public speaking in multiple professional and personal rhetorical situations. Prerequisites: 18 credits in COMM (not including COMM-100) and permission of instructor

Academic Citizenship Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

COMM-315 Persuasion

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to major theories and key concepts of persuasion. Using both social science and rhetorical criticism students will learn how individuals/social movements/institutions create, adapt, and respond to persuasive messages. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive appeals based on the rhetorical situation. Throughout the course students will consider the ethical implications of persuasive strategies and contexts.

COMM-325 Communication in the Organization

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Study and application of communication theories and principles in an organizational context. An explanation of organizational communication theories and principles will allow students to develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how communication affects the dynamics of the work environment. Emphasis will be placed on applying communication concepts to students' personal experience or participating in the organizational environment. Offered alternate years

COMM-410E Communication Law and Ethics in a Digital Age

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analytical survey of ethical and legal issues pertaining to communication professionals, focusing on the new digital media landscape. Issues explored include First Amendments rights, public affairs journalism, copyright, defamation, obscenity, censorship, licensing, corporate and governmental communications, and the Digital Millennium Act. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

COMM-420 Political Campaigning in Virtual Environments

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces the range of communication practices that characterize contemporary political campaigns. Students will process existing understandings of political communication theory in order to design and implement a semester-long campaign project.

Advanced Public Speaking/Performance Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

COMM-345 Argumentation and Debate

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course provides students with a foundational knowledge of classical principles of oral rhetoric and modern theories of the conventions of argumentation. Students will engage in critical examination of issues and the use of argumentation of support and defend a position. Upon completion of this course students will be able to construct and evaluate factual, value and policy claims. Prerequisite: COMM-100 Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

THEA-320 Improvisation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will focus on invention and structured improvisation as tools to explore "being in the moment" both on and off stage. Focusing on the body and voice through theatre games, creative dramatics, role-play, storytelling, clowning, autobiographical performance and movement, improvisation skills will be approached from two perspectives: concentration and action. Through responding to each other's playfulness, ingenuity and creativity, students will be encouraged to break through set thinking and movement patterns that may have limited them in the past. This class is not just for the theatre student! While the work is grounded in theatre, it can be applied to any discipline.

THEA-325 Acting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavski's system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, auditioning, performance pieces, and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW Offered alternate years FILA general education: fine arts & music

THEA-355 Environmental Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre, and as a result, restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold: to introduce the student to the cultural, social, and political richness of environmental theatre, including site-specific performance; to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time; and, to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

Visual Design Courses

Choose one of the following (3 credits):

ART-120 Introduction to Visual Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio project-based introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design in visual art and communication contexts. Emphasis is on visual problem solving, mastery of visual design principles, technical proficiency, and critical analysis of how visual images communicate. This course provides a foundation for students planning to take advanced courses in any art media and other fields in which visual imagery plays an important role. As a stand-alone course Art 120 provides critical and practical skills related to visual communication.

ART-322 Web Design and Development

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Design and construct websites using current HTML and CSS standards and digital tools including Brackets, Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis on design process, content development and professional workflows.

ART-323 Graphic Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

A studio based exploration into visual communication with typography and images using Adobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis is placed on the design process and creative thinking. Corequisite: ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-344 Photography

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digital cameras and software including Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop to create compelling photographs. Emphasis is placed on composition, visual communication and creative process in a contemporary photography context. Note: Students must provide a digital camera capable of manual exposure and Raw image capture. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-347 Videography I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn the fundamentals of video production including camera operation and control, stationary and moving camera techniques, audio recording, natural and artificial lighting, framing and shot structure, and use of nonlinear editing software. Students will complete hands-on exercises and assignments designed to build strong visual and technical skills needed to produce effective videos and short films. Corequisites: COMM-100, ENG-110, FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

COMM-481X Media Field Experience

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

This course is designed to provide students field experience in media production, media writing, media management and/or media relations. Prior to signing up for this course, students will work with the instructor to identify a field experience site where they can either help create content at a media outlet such as a television/radio station or film production studio, or where they can practice media relations for a business or non-profit organization. The course requires students to complete: (1) an initial face-to-face meeting with the course instructor, (2) online modules about communication-related issues in the workplace, (3) an initial and exit interview with their site supervisor, (4) 100 hours of work in the field, (5) reflective short essay assignments and (6) a final project consisting of an online portfolio of work they complete during the field experience. Students may take the course up to two times for credit, but each time must be at a different site. Prerequisites: COMM-100 and COMM-255W Corequisites: Junior standing in major FILA general education: experiential learning

(with visual design focus, must be approved by department)

COMM-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

(with visual design focus, must be approved by department)

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

Experiential Courses

Choose two of the following (6 credits):

ART-448X Videography II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Use skills gained in Art 347 to produce a short nonfiction video that promotes an idea, for example, a company profile, event promotion, advocacy or fundraising video, or mini-documentary. Topics will include treatments and proposals, planning, research and fact checking, interviewing, shot coverage, editing process, narrative structure and creative approach, and dissemination of the final product. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW, ENG-110, COMM-100, and ART-347 or permission of instructor FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-131X News Practicum

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Skills-and-theory class that applies critical thinking to discuss and solve practical problems in news media production. Prepares students for the convergence of media, providing practical experience in multi-platform media writing and production including print, radio, TV and web journalism. Work includes approximately three hours outside the class and one hour inside each week. May be repeated for a total of 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and 2 credits earned in COMM-131 or PWR-131 (Cross-listed as PWR-131X)

COMM-331X The Television & Film Studio System

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

The history of the American television and film studio system, its influence on society, and the processes of modern television and film production. Includes weekly class meetings on the Bridgewater campus (1 hour per week) and an 8-day trip to Los Angeles during Spring Break. While in Los Angeles, the class tours several studios (including Paramount Pictures, Warner Brothers, NBC television and/or Universal Studios), participates as audience members on a variety of television shows, talks with members of the television and film industry, and visits media related museums. Additional costs associated with travel. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and permission of instructor FILA general education: experiential learning

-or-

COMM-333X Europe Media and Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines the historical similarities and differences between American media and European media. The course will involve approximately a week of classes on the Bridgewater campus prior to traveling to several locations throughout Europe. Three major themes will be explored: 1) the use of persuasion and propaganda techniques employed during World War II and the Cold War, 2) the development of the European television and film industry (prior to WWII and after it), and 3) issues of media conglomeration, globalization, and the influence of the American film and television industry on Europe. Cities that may be toured include: London, Munich, Prague, Berlin and Paris. (The exact cities to be visited will change each year based on availability of speakers, film festivals, and museum special exhibits.) Additional costs associated with travel. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: world cultures and experiential learning

-or-

THEA-315X Theatre in London

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

An exploration of the rich and varied theatrical scenes in London through nightly attendance at professional and nonprofessional productions. The group attends professional West End, classical, modern, and musical productions. Immersive theatre, experimental performance, and alternative theatrical spaces/venues are explored. Workshops with professionals, theatre workshops, and back stage tours, as well as theatrical, historical, and cultural interests complement the experience as do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare's Globe theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music, and experiential learning

-or-

COMM-365X Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines the rhetorical strategies adopted by the American Civil Rights Movement. Students will study a wide variety of rhetorical artifacts such as documents and speeches, songs and other performances, lunch counter protests, sit-ins, Freedom Rides, photography and other forms of visual rhetoric. The course includes several days of courses on campus and a 10-day bus trip to key sites of the civil rights movement such as the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta. Students will have the opportunity to complete community service at some of the sites. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: experiential learning

-or-

COMM/MUS-370X Heroes, Flutes, and Ghosts: Stories and Opera

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines how stories, and particularly the hero narrative as captured by Joseph Campbell, are used in opera to inspire, engage, and provide social commentary, as well as to entertain. Understanding the audience (i.e., the historical time frame) and evaluating the medium (i.e., why set the story to music?) enriches our appreciation for and evaluation of the success of a story's message. Students will analyze how narrative changes when it is told through different media and will construct their own story using the medium of their choice. This course runs in conjunction with MUS 370 The History of Dramatic Music. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-481X Media Field Experience

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

This course is designed to provide students field experience in media production, media writing, media management and/or media relations. Prior to signing up for this course, students will work with the instructor to identify a field experience site where they can either help create content at a media outlet such as a television/radio station or film production studio, or where they can practice media relations for a business or non-profit organization. The course requires students to complete: (1) an initial face-to-face meeting with the course instructor, (2) online modules about communication-related issues in the workplace, (3) an initial and exit interview with their site supervisor, (4) 100 hours of work in the field, (5) reflective short essay assignments and (6) a final project consisting of an online portfolio of work they complete during the field experience. Students may take the course up to two times for credit, but each time must be at a different site. Prerequisites: COMM-100 and COMM-255W Corequisites: Junior standing in major FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

(with department approval)

COMM/MUS-309X Audio Production

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the world of modern multi-track recording. Students will gain experience with the equipment fundamental to audio engineering and production, including recording consoles, microphones, equalizers, time-based effects and Avid Pro Tools; the industry standard digital audio workstation. Participants will engage in a variety of projects which demonstrate the breadth of activity of an audio engineer. These include creating a podcast and engaging in a series of real world sessions with professional recording artists. Through these sessions, the techniques of recording, editing, mixing and mastering audio will be explored. Prerequisite: COMM-100 FILA general education: experiential learning Meets first 12 weeks. (Cross-listed as MUS-309X)

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

An additional 12 credit hours are required from the following list of courses (only 6 credit hours may be taken from courses without the COMM prefix):

COMM All courses designated COMM (except COMM-100)

ART-120 Introduction to Visual Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio project-based introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design in visual art and communication contexts. Emphasis is on visual problem solving, mastery of visual design principles, technical proficiency, and critical analysis of how visual images communicate. This course provides a foundation for students planning to take advanced courses in any art media and other fields in which visual imagery plays an important role. As a stand-alone course Art 120 provides critical and practical skills related to visual communication.

ART-322 Web Design and Development

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Design and construct websites using current HTML and CSS standards and digital tools including Brackets, Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis on design process, content development and professional workflows.

ART-323 Graphic Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

A studio based exploration into visual communication with typography and images using Adobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis is placed on the design process and creative thinking. Corequisite: ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-344 Photography

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digital cameras and software including Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop to create compelling photographs. Emphasis is placed on composition, visual communication and creative process in a contemporary photography context. Note: Students must provide a digital camera capable of manual exposure and Raw image capture. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-347 Videography I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn the fundamentals of video production including camera operation and control, stationary and moving camera techniques, audio recording, natural and artificial lighting, framing and shot structure, and use of nonlinear editing software. Students will complete hands-on exercises and assignments designed to build strong visual and technical skills needed to produce effective videos and short films. Corequisites: COMM-100, ENG-110, FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

PWR-201 Introduction to Professional Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces students to a range of rhetorical principles and practices in professional genres that they will explore in future coursework and in their careers. Prerequisite: ENG-110

PWR-311 Creative Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Intensive workshop providing an opportunity to gain deeper insight into literary techniques and practices through the production of original short and longer works of fiction, poetry and drama, as well as creative expository forms. Students develop a single, but substantial, literary project unified by a common theme or themes. Group workshops and individual conferences provide extensive feedback and critical response as the student progresses through the project. Prerequisite: ENG-110

PWR-312W Technical & Workplace Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Advanced writing course in composing reports, proposals, instructions, brochures, digital information and other technical documents. Principles of document design, strategies for incorporating graphic elements into texts and methods of editing are also emphasized. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive

PWR-318W Writing for Digital Media

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Or Spring

Studies the nature of writing as it is shaped by digital technologies, including desktop publishing, document design and electronic portfolios. Implications of these media for writing in both theory and practice are emphasized. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive

Theatre Major

Degree Type Offered: B.A. Major

Consists of a minimum of 37 credit hours:

Core Courses

25 credit hours consisting of the following courses:

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

-or-

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

THEA-250 World Theatre History I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social, political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama, Roman spectacle, Sanskrit Drama, Noh Drama, early Medieval religious and secular theatre, Italian commedia dell'arte, Renaissance and Baroque pageantry, and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, both textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-255 World Theatre History II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture, history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I, the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey, China and Japan, and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera, melodrama and poetic spectacle, Realism, Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-325 Acting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavski's system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, auditioning, performance pieces, and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW Offered alternate years FILA general education: fine arts & music

THEA-330 Directing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of directing plays for the stage. Students will carefully examine play structure and analysis, communication with the actor and designer, and rehearsal process and performance. Students will explore the work of the director through laboratory exercise, and short performance piece where students cast and direct their own scenes. Examining the techniques of many of the most influential 20th century stage directors, students will work towards a technique that the student can call his/her own. Practical work will be combined with written analysis in addition to the final short student-director production. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-320 Improvisation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will focus on invention and structured improvisation as tools to explore "being in the moment" both on and off stage. Focusing on the body and voice through theatre games, creative dramatics, role-play, storytelling, clowning, autobiographical performance and movement, improvisation skills will be approached from two perspectives: concentration and action. Through responding to each other's playfulness, ingenuity and creativity, students will be encouraged to break through set thinking and movement patterns that may have limited them in the past. This class is not just for the theatre student! While the work is grounded in theatre, it can be applied to any discipline.

MUS-113 Class Voice

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

This introductory course is intended for students with little prior singing experience. No music reading skills are necessary. Students study posture, breathing, articulation and resonance. By the end of the class students will have basic singing skills.

THEA-370X Special Topics in Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A study of specific topics related to theatre including Movement for the Performer, Playwriting, Set Design, Lighting Design, and Costume Design. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music & experiential learning

THEA-450 Theatre Capstone

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A formal capstone experience focused on the student's area of concentration. Defined through consultation with the theatre faculty, the capstone will outline and realize a body of theatrical work and presentation. Focus could be on acting, design (set, light, costume), directing a fully realized theatre production, as well as the writing of a full-length play or a significant project in historical research and writing. Projects must be submitted and approved by theatre faculty prior to the student's final year of study. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Production Laboratory/Applied Performance

Students participating in Theatre at Bridgewater College performances/productions work as performers, technical theatre assistants, stage managers, assistant directors, and other production positions. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation.

Complete 3 credits from the following:

THEA-310 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (acting, Movement)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Production laboratory requiring intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. Requires the student to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting, rehearsing and performing a play. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor

THEA-311 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (Lighting, Costumes and Makeup, Scenic Painting, Scenery and Props, Technical Direction, and Sound)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of technology associated with lighting, costumes and makeup, scenery and properties, scenic painting, technical direction, and sound as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest designer to interpret, create, and implement effective designs. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-312 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (stage Management, Dramaturgy, Assistant Directing)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of techniques associated with stage management, dramaturgy, and assistant directing as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest artists to interpret, create, and implement effective theatrical performances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Theatre Practice and Design

Select 2 courses (6 credits) from list below, with at minimum 1 course with THEA suffix, or other course(s) approved by department.

ART-120 Introduction to Visual Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio project-based introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design in visual art and communication contexts. Emphasis is on visual problem solving, mastery of visual design principles, technical proficiency, and critical analysis of how visual images communicate. This course provides a foundation for students planning to take advanced courses in any art media and other fields in which visual imagery plays an important role. As a stand-alone course Art 120 provides critical and practical skills related to visual communication.

ART-130 Introduction to Drawing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio based exploration of drawing from observation using basic materials like graphite and charcoal. This course investigates drawing as a process generating and critically evaluating visual ideas as well as producing visual imagery. Art 130 is a foundation course for students planning to take advanced art courses in any medium. As a stand-alone, this course builds practical and theoretical skills in seeing and making the 2-D images we call drawings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music

ART-335 Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A project based investigation of the materials, practices, and aesthetics of painting with emphasis on how these three elements work together to create compelling 2-D colored images. This course provides practical and theoretical foundations for four hundred-level courses in drawing and painting and for independent work in these media. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-347 Videography I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn the fundamentals of video production including camera operation and control, stationary and moving camera techniques, audio recording, natural and artificial lighting, framing and shot structure, and use of nonlinear editing software. Students will complete hands-on exercises and assignments designed to build strong visual and technical skills needed to produce effective videos and short films. Corequisites: COMM-100, ENG-110, FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

FCS-340 Fashion, Apparel and Textiles

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion including the sociological, psychological and physiological aspects of clothing and basic construction of clothing.

MUS-110 Music Fundamentals

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

No musical experience required. An introduction to reading music: scales, key signatures, intervals, rhythms, instruments and score study. Hands-on musical activities include eurhythmics, singing, and the playing of simple percussive and melodic instruments. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music

-or-

MUS-225 Theory and Aural Skills I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Diatonic harmony, voice leading and phrase structure. Aural skills include sight singing and melodic dictation. Prerequisites: MUS-110

-or-

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

THEA-225 Scenic Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Practical study of the various theories, techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice, encompasses a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis on traditional scene painting techniques, including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes, as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically, and how these unique changes have impacted the materials and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. Engages with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they perform on different types of materials, and how that knowledge can be used to create effective results. Projects include painting stage drops, creating stained glass windows with paint, faux marble and wood grain finishes, photos and designer renderings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-315X Theatre in London

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

An exploration of the rich and varied theatrical scenes in London through nightly attendance at professional and nonprofessional productions. The group attends professional West End, classical, modern, and musical productions. Immersive theatre, experimental performance, and alternative theatrical spaces/venues are explored. Workshops with professionals, theatre workshops, and back stage tours, as well as theatrical, historical, and cultural interests complement the experience as do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare's Globe theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music, and experiential learning

THEA-345 Acting: Styles and Techniques

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will introduce the student to the physical, vocal, and mental worlds of various styles and techniques of non-realistic performance traditions. Students will experiment with a variety of acting styles and techniques including physical, masked, post-modern, non-western, and devised performance. This course includes interfaith components of eastern meditative, movement, and centering practices as they are linked to acting methods and techniques. This course is a practical expression of the theoretical and historical. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, and various training exercises will be used. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Offered alternate years

THEA-370X Special Topics in Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A study of specific topics related to theatre including Movement for the Performer, Playwriting, Set Design, Lighting Design, and Costume Design. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music & experiential learning

THEA-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

THEA-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

History, Theory and Criticism

Select 1 course (3 credits) from list below or other course(s) approved by department.

THEA-355 Environmental Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre, and as a result, restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold: to introduce the student to the cultural, social, and political richness of environmental theatre, including site-specific performance; to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time; and, to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA/ENG-360W Modern Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays, Realism, Expressionism, Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen, Bernard Shaw, Anton Chekhov, Eugene O'Neill, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-360W)

THEA/ENG-362W Contemporary Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Students will begin with post-World War II dramatic works and move sequentially to the present day. Some areas of attention will be the "angry young men," metadrama, gender race and ethnicity, the "new brutalism," and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus will be on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne, Edward Albee, Edward Bond, José Rivera, Martin McDonagh, Tony Kushner, Sarah Kane, Suzan Lori-Parks, Nilo Cruz, Moisés Kaufman, Sarah Ruhl and others will be studied. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-362W)

ENG-330 Shakespeare

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Critical examination of Shakespeare's development as a dramatist and of his basic themes. Approximately 12 plays are studied. Prerequisite: ENG-110 FILA general education: literature

ENG-400 Seminar in a Major Literary Figure

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Critical examination of the life and writing of a major figure from American, British, or world literature. May take more than once for credit if the featured literary figure is different each time. Figures may include Dante, Geoffrey Chaucer, John Milton, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, Henrik Ibsen, William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf or William Faulkner. Prerequisites: ENG-110 FILA general education: literature

THEA-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

THEA-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

Communication Studies Minor

Degree Type Offered: Minor

Consists of a minimum of 18 credit hours.

Required courses (9 credits):

COMM-230 Communication Technologies: History, Culture, and Society

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An introduction to the history and influence of communication technology in society. The class will explore the various social, political, cultural, and economic impacts of new communication technology. Major topics include: the origins of writing, printing, photography, film, the telegraph and telephone, radio, television, and the internet.

COMM-240 Contemporary Media Industries

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines how electronic media industries have changed the way we produce and consume media products. The course will examine how the digital age has impacted notions of interactivity, virtual space, media production, networks and credibility. Particular attention will be paid to the social, economic and political implications of these changes.

COMM-327 Interpersonal Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines issues related to communication within personal and professional relationships. Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of verbal and nonverbal communication, the role of technology in interpersonal communication and how interpersonal communication functions to develop, negotiate, maintain and terminate relationships.

Choose any other 9 credit hours with a COMM prefix (other than COMM-100)

Theatre Minor

Degree Type Offered: Minor

Consists of 21 credit hours.

Required Courses

9 credit hours of the following :

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

-or-

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

THEA-250 World Theatre History I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social, political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama, Roman spectacle, Sanskrit Drama, Noh Drama, early Medieval religious and secular theatre, Italian commedia dell'arte, Renaissance and Baroque pageantry, and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, both textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

-or-

THEA-255 World Theatre History II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture, history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I, the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey, China and Japan, and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera, melodrama and poetic spectacle, Realism, Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-325 Acting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavski's system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, auditioning, performance pieces, and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW Offered alternate years FILA general education: fine arts & music

-or-

THEA-345 Acting: Styles and Techniques

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will introduce the student to the physical, vocal, and mental worlds of various styles and techniques of non-realistic performance traditions. Students will experiment with a variety of acting styles and techniques including physical, masked, post-modern, non-western, and devised performance. This course includes interfaith components of eastern meditative, movement, and centering practices as they are linked to acting methods and techniques. This course is a practical expression of the theoretical and historical. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, and various training exercises will be used. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Offered alternate years

3 credit hours of the following :

THEA-310 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (acting, Movement)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Production laboratory requiring intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. Requires the student to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting, rehearsing and performing a play. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor

-or-

THEA-311 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (Lighting, Costumes and Makeup, Scenic Painting, Scenery and Props, Technical Direction, and Sound)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of technology associated with lighting, costumes and makeup, scenery and properties, scenic painting, technical direction, and sound as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest designer to interpret, create, and implement effective designs. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

-or-

THEA-312 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (stage Management, Dramaturgy, Assistant Directing)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of techniques associated with stage management, dramaturgy, and assistant directing as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest artists to interpret, create, and implement effective theatrical performances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

Theatre Practice and Design

Select 2 courses (6 credit hours) from the list below, with at minimum 1 course with THEA suffix, or other course(s) approved by department.

ART-120 Introduction to Visual Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio project-based introduction to the elements and principles of 2-D and 3-D design in visual art and communication contexts. Emphasis is on visual problem solving, mastery of visual design principles, technical proficiency, and critical analysis of how visual images communicate. This course provides a foundation for students planning to take advanced courses in any art media and other fields in which visual imagery plays an important role. As a stand-alone course Art 120 provides critical and practical skills related to visual communication.

ART-130 Introduction to Drawing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A studio based exploration of drawing from observation using basic materials like graphite and charcoal. This course investigates drawing as a process generating and critically evaluating visual ideas as well as producing visual imagery. Art 130 is a foundation course for students planning to take advanced art courses in any medium. As a stand-alone, this course builds practical and theoretical skills in seeing and making the 2-D images we call drawings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music

ART-335 Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A project based investigation of the materials, practices, and aesthetics of painting with emphasis on how these three elements work together to create compelling 2-D colored images. This course provides practical and theoretical foundations for four hundred-level courses in drawing and painting and for independent work in these media. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-347 Videography I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn the fundamentals of video production including camera operation and control, stationary and moving camera techniques, audio recording, natural and artificial lighting, framing and shot structure, and use of nonlinear editing software. Students will complete hands-on exercises and assignments designed to build strong visual and technical skills needed to produce effective videos and short films. Corequisites: COMM-100, ENG-110, FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

FCS-340 Fashion, Apparel and Textiles

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Emphasis on factors influencing fashion including the sociological, psychological and physiological aspects of clothing and basic construction of clothing.

MUS-110 Music Fundamentals

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

No musical experience required. An introduction to reading music: scales, key signatures, intervals, rhythms, instruments and score study. Hands-on musical activities include eurhythmics, singing, and the playing of simple percussive and melodic instruments. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music

-or-

MUS-225 Theory and Aural Skills I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Diatonic harmony, voice leading and phrase structure. Aural skills include sight singing and melodic dictation. Prerequisites: MUS-110

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

-or-

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

THEA-370X Special Topics in Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A study of specific topics related to theatre including Movement for the Performer, Playwriting, Set Design, Lighting Design, and Costume Design. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music & experiential learning

THEA-225 Scenic Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Practical study of the various theories, techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice, encompasses a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis on traditional scene painting techniques, including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes, as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically, and how these unique changes have impacted the materials and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. Engages with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they perform on different types of materials, and how that knowledge can be used to create effective results. Projects include painting stage drops, creating stained glass windows with paint, faux marble and wood grain finishes, photos and designer renderings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-315X Theatre in London

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

An exploration of the rich and varied theatrical scenes in London through nightly attendance at professional and nonprofessional productions. The group attends professional West End, classical, modern, and musical productions. Immersive theatre, experimental performance, and alternative theatrical spaces/venues are explored. Workshops with professionals, theatre workshops, and back stage tours, as well as theatrical, historical, and cultural interests complement the experience as do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare's Globe theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music, and experiential learning

THEA-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

THEA-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

History, Theory and Criticism

Select 1 course (3 credit hours) from list below or other course(s) approved by department.

THEA-355 Environmental Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre, and as a result, restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold: to introduce the student to the cultural, social, and political richness of environmental theatre, including site-specific performance; to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time; and, to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-360W Modern Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays, Realism, Expressionism, Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen, Bernard Shaw, Anton Chekhov, Eugene O'Neill, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-360W)

THEA-362W Contemporary Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Students will begin with post-World War II dramatic works and move sequentially to the present day. Some areas of attention will be the "angry young men," metadrama, gender race and ethnicity, the "new brutalism," and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus will be on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne, Edward Albee, Edward Bond, José Rivera, Martin McDonagh, Tony Kushner, Sarah Kane, Suzan Lori-Parks, Nilo Cruz, Moisés Kaufman, Sarah Ruhl and others will be studied. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-362W)

ENG-330 Shakespeare

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Critical examination of Shakespeare's development as a dramatist and of his basic themes. Approximately 12 plays are studied. Prerequisite: ENG-110 FILA general education: literature

ENG-400 Seminar in a Major Literary Figure

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Critical examination of the life and writing of a major figure from American, British, or world literature. May take more than once for credit if the featured literary figure is different each time. Figures may include Dante, Geoffrey Chaucer, John Milton, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, Henrik Ibsen, William Butler Yeats, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf or William Faulkner. Prerequisites: ENG-110 FILA general education: literature

THEA-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

THEA-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

Endorsement in Theatre Arts (PreK–12)

Degree Type Offered: Teacher Licensure

Consists of the education course sequence required for secondary licensure and the following courses:

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-250 World Theatre History I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social, political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama, Roman spectacle, Sanskrit Drama, Noh Drama, early Medieval religious and secular theatre, Italian commedia dell'arte, Renaissance and Baroque pageantry, and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, both textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-255 World Theatre History II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture, history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I, the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey, China and Japan, and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera, melodrama and poetic spectacle, Realism, Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-325 Acting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavski's system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, auditioning, performance pieces, and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW Offered alternate years FILA general education: fine arts & music

THEA-330 Directing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of directing plays for the stage. Students will carefully examine play structure and analysis, communication with the actor and designer, and rehearsal process and performance. Students will explore the work of the director through laboratory exercise, and short performance piece where students cast and direct their own scenes. Examining the techniques of many of the most influential 20th century stage directors, students will work towards a technique that the student can call his/her own. Practical work will be combined with written analysis in addition to the final short student-director production. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA/ENG-360W Modern Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays, Realism, Expressionism, Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen, Bernard Shaw, Anton Chekhov, Eugene O'Neill, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-360W)

-or-

THEA/ENG-362W Contemporary Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Students will begin with post-World War II dramatic works and move sequentially to the present day. Some areas of attention will be the "angry young men," metadrama, gender race and ethnicity, the "new brutalism," and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus will be on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne, Edward Albee, Edward Bond, José Rivera, Martin McDonagh, Tony Kushner, Sarah Kane, Suzan Lori-Parks, Nilo Cruz, Moisés Kaufman, Sarah Ruhl and others will be studied. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-362W)

Courses

COMM-100 Oral Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Teaches students how to create and respond to verbal and nonverbal messages across a variety of rhetorical situations. Students will learn the core concepts of public speaking and develop the skills to select, organize, and deliver material based on the needs of a specific audience. The course will focus on informative and persuasive speaking, and may also include introductory speeches, special-occasion speeches, and business presentations. FILA general education: master core skills

COMM-131 News Practicum

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Skills-and-theory class that applies critical thinking to discuss and solve practical problems in news media production. Prepares students for the convergence of media, providing practical experience in multiplatform media writing and production, including print, radio, TV and web journalism. Work includes approximately three hours outside the class and one hour inside each week. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits. (Cross-listed as PWR-131)

COMM-131X News Practicum

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Skills-and-theory class that applies critical thinking to discuss and solve practical problems in news media production. Prepares students for the convergence of media, providing practical experience in multi-platform media writing and production including print, radio, TV and web journalism. Work includes approximately three hours outside the class and one hour inside each week. May be repeated for a total of 3 credit hours. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and 2 credits earned in COMM-131 or PWR-131 (Cross-listed as PWR-131X)

COMM-201 Introduction to Communication Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces students to communication as an academic discipline by exploring how meaning is created and shared in multiple contexts. Verbal and nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication, mass media, communication technologies, popular culture, and communication in organizations are among the topics covered.

COMM-230 Communication Technologies: History, Culture, and Society

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An introduction to the history and influence of communication technology in society. The class will explore the various social, political, cultural, and economic impacts of new communication technology. Major topics include: the origins of writing, printing, photography, film, the telegraph and telephone, radio, television, and the internet.

COMM-240 Contemporary Media Industries

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines how electronic media industries have changed the way we produce and consume media products. The course will examine how the digital age has impacted notions of interactivity, virtual space, media production, networks and credibility. Particular attention will be paid to the social, economic and political implications of these changes.

COMM-255W Introduction to News Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Teaches students the basic skills of researching, investigating and writing in a variety of formats. Emphasis on identification of the writing structures used by contemporary media writers and utilization of these structures in original pieces researched and written by the students. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as PWR-255W)

COMM-300 Special Topics in Communication Studies- Social Media, Peacebuilding, & Democracy

Credits: 3 Term Offered:

This course will explore how social media both contributes to and threatens democracy and peace. Students will explore positive examples of social media aiding peacebuilding, such as through improving communication and trust between government, police, hospitals, schools and the communities they serve, improving humanitarian responses during crises, supporting grassroots social change movements, and enabling on-line interreligious and intergroup dialogue to engage with diverse perspectives. In addition, students will explore the mounting evidence that social media is having a significant negative impact on democracy, social polarization, and even contributing to direct violence in the US, the Philippines, Cambodia, Brazil, and Myanmar. Through discussion, research papers and applied projects, students will explore a range of potential solutions for addressing social media threats, including the role of social movements, redesign of social media platforms, and government regulations on tech companies.

COMM-305 Multimedia Reporting and Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Builds on the skills-oriented approach of COMM/PWR-255W by putting theory behind the practice of writing. Through individual and group writing projects, students work toward understanding the increasingly complex definition of news, its blurring line with entertainment, and the dynamic interplay between technologies and audiences. Prerequisite: COMM/PWR-255W or permission of instructor Offered alternate years: 2020-2021 (Cross-listed as PWR-305)

COMM-306 Investigative Journalism & Documentary

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Students in this course will learn and apply investigative journalism and history research methodologies and techniques to produce long-form journalistic materials. This course will teach students how to identify, collect, analyze, reproduce, preserve, and report on historical and difficult-to-access data and artifacts. Students will learn documentary production techniques and long-form journalism writing.

COMM-309X Audio Production

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course provides a hands-on introduction to the world of modern multi-track recording. Students will gain experience with the equipment fundamental to audio engineering and production, including recording consoles, microphones, equalizers, time-based effects and Avid Pro Tools; the industry standard digital audio workstation. Participants will engage in a variety of projects which demonstrate the breadth of activity of an audio engineer. These include creating a podcast and engaging in a series of real world sessions with professional recording artists. Through these sessions, the techniques of recording, editing, mixing and mastering audio will be explored. Prerequisite: COMM-100 FILA general education: experiential learning Meets first 12 weeks. (Cross-listed as MUS-309X)

COMM-315 Persuasion

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to major theories and key concepts of persuasion. Using both social science and rhetorical criticism students will learn how individuals/social movements/institutions create, adapt, and respond to persuasive messages. Students will evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive appeals based on the rhetorical situation. Throughout the course students will consider the ethical implications of persuasive strategies and contexts.

COMM-325 Communication in the Organization

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Study and application of communication theories and principles in an organizational context. An explanation of organizational communication theories and principles will allow students to develop a theoretical and practical understanding of how communication affects the dynamics of the work environment. Emphasis will be placed on applying communication concepts to students' personal experience or participating in the organizational environment. Offered alternate years

COMM-327 Interpersonal Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines issues related to communication within personal and professional relationships. Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of verbal and nonverbal communication, the role of technology in interpersonal communication and how interpersonal communication functions to develop, negotiate, maintain and terminate relationships.

COMM-330 American Film & Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Critical examination of the history of film and its influences on society. Includes exploration of the various methods of studying film. Topics covered include the development of film messages, production systems, and the future of film. Special emphasis on the exploration of how film messages can perpetuate and influence our views of social groups marked by, gender, race, class, sexuality and age. Offered alternate years: 2020-2021

COMM-331X The Television & Film Studio System

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

The history of the American television and film studio system, its influence on society, and the processes of modern television and film production. Includes weekly class meetings on the Bridgewater campus (1 hour per week) and an 8-day trip to Los Angeles during Spring Break. While in Los Angeles, the class tours several studios (including Paramount Pictures, Warner Brothers, NBC television and/or Universal Studios), participates as audience members on a variety of television shows, talks with members of the television and film industry, and visits media related museums. Additional costs associated with travel. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and permission of instructor FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-332 American Television & Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Critical examination of the history of television and its influence on society. Includes exploration of the various methods of studying television. Topics covered include the development of the television industry, various television genres and the future of television. Special emphasis on the exploration of how television messages influence our views of social groups marked by gender, race, class, sexuality and age. Offered alternate years

COMM-333X Europe Media and Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines the historical similarities and differences between American media and European media. The course will involve approximately a week of classes on the Bridgewater campus prior to traveling to several locations throughout Europe. Three major themes will be explored: 1) the use of persuasion and propaganda techniques employed during World War II and the Cold War, 2) the development of the European television and film industry (prior to WWII and after it), and 3) issues of media conglomeration, globalization, and the influence of the American film and television industry on Europe. Cities that may be toured include: London, Munich, Prague, Berlin and Paris. (The exact cities to be visited will change each year based on availability of speakers, film festivals, and museum special exhibits.) Additional costs associated with travel. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: world cultures and experiential learning

COMM-334 Intercultural Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Theoretical and practical survey of intercultural communication processes. Examines intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, and mass media dimensions of intercultural communication. The course specifically focuses on the distinctive cultural behaviors, expectations, values and power dynamics that affect our abilities to communicate effectively and people from diverse cultures. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: world cultures

COMM-335 Communicating Sex and Gender

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of the role of sex and gender in verbal and nonverbal communication, friendships, families, romantic relationships and professional relationships. This course also examines the issues of technology, health, power and violence as they related to sex and gender. Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

COMM-337 Intergenerational Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Explores how communication and technology use changes across the life span and varies between generations. Students will study technological, life course, and generational theory. They will examine their own generational communication and technology use as well as considering the perspectives of those in different generational cohorts. Opportunities throughout the course are provided for students to interact with a variety of generations to promote intergenerational understanding. Alternate years: offered 2020-2021

COMM-340 Representations of Gender, Race & Class

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines the media's role in creating and re-creating our understanding of gender, race, and class. Includes a historical perspective, and traces how these representations have changed over time, the forces that have affected representations of gender, race and class, and the current state of their representation in the media. A field trip to at least one museum in Washington, D.C. is planned, depending upon exhibits available at the time (e.g. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian's American History Museum). Alternate years: offered 2020-2021

COMM-345 Argumentation and Debate

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course provides students with a foundational knowledge of classical principles of oral rhetoric and modern theories of the conventions of argumentation. Students will engage in critical examination of issues and the use of argumentation of support and defend a position. Upon completion of this course students will be able to construct and evaluate factual, value and policy claims. Prerequisite: COMM-100 Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

COMM-347 Strategic Public Relations

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course will cover strategic planning and specialized public relations issues. Issues include risks, crisis management, social marketing campaigns, and corporate and non-profit communication. Students will learn and apply advanced public relations theories and skills to case studies and real-life situations. Prerequisites: COMM/PWR-255W and one of the following courses ART-322, ART-323, ART-344, ART-347

COMM-349 Nonprofit Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This class examines the organizational structure of nonprofit and non-governmental organizations and their operations such as fund raising; social cause communication including advocacy; and leadership communication that strengthens the organization's mission. Students will prepare materials used by nonprofits - appeals, alerts, opinion letters or columns, online channels, speeches and event scripts, among others - evaluating effectiveness and adhering to ethical considerations. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG 110

COMM-350 Research Methods in Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces quantitative and qualitative research methods used in the study of communication. Students learn to critically evaluate published research studies and how to conduct original research. The course will provide specific instruction and practice in survey writing and interviewing. Prerequisite: 6 credits in COMM (not including COMM-100) Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

COMM-355 Long-Form Multimedia Journalism

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Long-form journalism focuses on in-depth nonfiction narrative, with creative stories told in memorable ways. Students will read and digest contemporary long-form journalism ranging from The New York Times' Pulitzer-prize winning feature on the avalanche at Tunnel Creek to WIRED magazine's series of articles on the Internet "dark web" of drug sales, the Silk Road. Students will also read excerpts from classic long-form journalism such as Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, John Hersey's Hiroshima, Lawrence Otis Graham's "Harlem on My Mind" and Joan Didion's Slouching Toward Bethlehem. Students will analyze, reflect on and write using the techniques of creative nonfiction. Students will learn about user experience design theory (UX Design), a method to improve the usability and accessibility of and user pleasure from media products, by implementing visual and aural narrative elements to craft an engaging experience for the audience. Prerequisites: COMM/PWR-255W, or ENG-310 or PWR-318W or permission of instructor

COMM-360 Rhetorical Criticism

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Summer

Introduces students to major issues and perspectives in rhetorical criticism, including foundational concepts from the history of rhetorical theory and methods of rhetorical analysis. By surveying traditional and contemporary approaches to rhetorical criticism, readings will engage students in thinking about symbol use, reflecting upon the power of language ad human symbolic activity and systematically exploring how these processes work and how they influence is. Rhetorical approaches examine how to use language and symbols more effectively, how to communicate in more self-reflective ways and how to evaluate messages that better accomplish strategic goals. This is an online course offering.

COMM-365X Rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines the rhetorical strategies adopted by the American Civil Rights Movement. Students will study a wide variety of rhetorical artifacts such as documents and speeches, songs and other performances, lunch counter protests, sit-ins, Freedom Rides, photography and other forms of visual rhetoric. The course includes several days of courses on campus and a 10-day bus trip to key sites of the civil rights movement such as the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, and the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta. Students will have the opportunity to complete community service at some of the sites. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-370X Heroes, Flutes, and Ghosts: Stories and Opera

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course examines how stories, and particularly the hero narrative as captured by Joseph Campbell, are used in opera to inspire, engage, and provide social commentary, as well as to entertain. Understanding the audience (i.e., the historical time frame) and evaluating the medium (i.e., why set the story to music?) enriches our appreciation for and evaluation of the success of a story's message. Students will analyze how narrative changes when it is told through different media and will construct their own story using the medium of their choice. This course runs in conjunction with MUS 370 The History of Dramatic Music. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-375 Media Effects

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines media effects research from the early 20th century to the present. Students learn about various methods used by social scientists to identify and measure the effects of persuasive messages on changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. Students gain skills in framing research questions about media effects, designing effects studies and evaluating claims of media effects advocated by scholarly and non-scholarly sources. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: social sciences

COMM-400 Applied Communication Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

This capstone course explores practical applications of communication theory. Emphasis will be placed on the process of writing and public speaking in multiple professional and personal rhetorical situations. Prerequisites: 18 credits in COMM (not including COMM-100) and permission of instructor

COMM-410E Communication Law and Ethics in a Digital Age

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analytical survey of ethical and legal issues pertaining to communication professionals, focusing on the new digital media landscape. Issues explored include First Amendments rights, public affairs journalism, copyright, defamation, obscenity, censorship, licensing, corporate and governmental communications, and the Digital Millennium Act. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

COMM-420 Political Campaigning in Virtual Environments

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces the range of communication practices that characterize contemporary political campaigns. Students will process existing understandings of political communication theory in order to design and implement a semester-long campaign project.

COMM-427 Communication in Romantic Relationships

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines issues and research related to communication in romantic relationships including serial arguments, conflict management, technology mediated communication, power dynamics, and post-dissolutional communication. Particular emphasis will be placed on examining the utility of popular press relationship advice by comparing and contrasting with empirical research. Offered alternate years

COMM-447 Science, Environment, and Health Communication

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Examines the role of news, advocacy, scientific analysis, decision and policy making, risk perception, and other factors in the communication of issues related to science, environment, and health. Provides students with rich theoretical background, critical understanding, and practical skills to produce, investigate and critique communication processes related to the topics. Students in this course are required to conduct field work and original research, write and publish news, and analytical articles.

COMM-481X Media Field Experience

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

This course is designed to provide students field experience in media production, media writing, media management and/or media relations. Prior to signing up for this course, students will work with the instructor to identify a field experience site where they can either help create content at a media outlet such as a television/radio station or film production studio, or where they can practice media relations for a business or non-profit organization. The course requires students to complete: (1) an initial face-to-face meeting with the course instructor, (2) online modules about communication-related issues in the workplace, (3) an initial and exit interview with their site supervisor, (4) 100 hours of work in the field, (5) reflective short essay assignments and (6) a final project consisting of an online portfolio of work they complete during the field experience. Students may take the course up to two times for credit, but each time must be at a different site. Prerequisites: COMM-100 and COMM-255W Corequisites: Junior standing in major FILA general education: experiential learning

COMM-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

COMM-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

COMM-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-210 Theatre Production: Lighting and Sound

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with a special focus on stage management and emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: lighting and sound. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

THEA-225 Scenic Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Practical study of the various theories, techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice, encompasses a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis on traditional scene painting techniques, including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes, as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically, and how these unique changes have impacted the materials and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. Engages with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they perform on different types of materials, and how that knowledge can be used to create effective results. Projects include painting stage drops, creating stained glass windows with paint, faux marble and wood grain finishes, photos and designer renderings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-250 World Theatre History I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Traces the development of dramatic art and the history of theatrical production from its ritual beginnings to the English Restoration. It will place dramatic art and theatre history in context by engaging with the social, political and cultural conditions of specific historical moments. Topics of study will include Greek Drama, Roman spectacle, Sanskrit Drama, Noh Drama, early Medieval religious and secular theatre, Italian commedia dell'arte, Renaissance and Baroque pageantry, and the English Restoration. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, both textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-255 World Theatre History II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of post-Restoration theatrical culture, history and production forms. Though it is a continuation of the World Theatre History I, the student need not have taken the previous course. Students will begin examining theatrical history and expression in Turkey, China and Japan, and move across the European continent focusing on the rise of European modernity. Students will cover Romantic theatre and opera, melodrama and poetic spectacle, Realism, Naturalism and the independent theatre movement as well as the innovation of early 20th century theatrical practitioners. The approach will be a documentary one. Students will read specific play texts in conjunction with primary evidence, textural and pictorial, using both to illuminate the creation and history of theatre. Corequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-310 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (acting, Movement)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Production laboratory requiring intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. Requires the student to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting, rehearsing and performing a play. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor

THEA-311 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (Lighting, Costumes and Makeup, Scenic Painting, Scenery and Props, Technical Direction, and Sound)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of technology associated with lighting, costumes and makeup, scenery and properties, scenic painting, technical direction, and sound as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest designer to interpret, create, and implement effective designs. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-312 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (stage Management, Dramaturgy, Assistant Directing)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of techniques associated with stage management, dramaturgy, and assistant directing as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest artists to interpret, create, and implement effective theatrical performances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-315X Theatre in London

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

An exploration of the rich and varied theatrical scenes in London through nightly attendance at professional and nonprofessional productions. The group attends professional West End, classical, modern, and musical productions. Immersive theatre, experimental performance, and alternative theatrical spaces/venues are explored. Workshops with professionals, theatre workshops, and back stage tours, as well as theatrical, historical, and cultural interests complement the experience as do side-trips to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare's Globe theatre. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music, and experiential learning

THEA-320 Improvisation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will focus on invention and structured improvisation as tools to explore "being in the moment" both on and off stage. Focusing on the body and voice through theatre games, creative dramatics, role-play, storytelling, clowning, autobiographical performance and movement, improvisation skills will be approached from two perspectives: concentration and action. Through responding to each other's playfulness, ingenuity and creativity, students will be encouraged to break through set thinking and movement patterns that may have limited them in the past. This class is not just for the theatre student! While the work is grounded in theatre, it can be applied to any discipline.

THEA-325 Acting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Acting provides the student with an organized and practical approach to acting. A systematic approach to acting through a thorough examination and application of Konstantin Stanislavski's system of acting with in depth attention to the technique of the actor and their use of body and voice. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, auditioning, performance pieces, and various training exercises will be used. No theatre experience is necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW Offered alternate years FILA general education: fine arts & music

THEA-330 Directing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of directing plays for the stage. Students will carefully examine play structure and analysis, communication with the actor and designer, and rehearsal process and performance. Students will explore the work of the director through laboratory exercise, and short performance piece where students cast and direct their own scenes. Examining the techniques of many of the most influential 20th century stage directors, students will work towards a technique that the student can call his/her own. Practical work will be combined with written analysis in addition to the final short student-director production. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-345 Acting: Styles and Techniques

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will introduce the student to the physical, vocal, and mental worlds of various styles and techniques of non-realistic performance traditions. Students will experiment with a variety of acting styles and techniques including physical, masked, post-modern, non-western, and devised performance. This course includes interfaith components of eastern meditative, movement, and centering practices as they are linked to acting methods and techniques. This course is a practical expression of the theoretical and historical. Textual analysis, scene work, monologues, and various training exercises will be used. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts & music Offered alternate years

THEA-355 Environmental Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre, and as a result, restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold: to introduce the student to the cultural, social, and political richness of environmental theatre, including site-specific performance; to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time; and, to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music Offered alternate years

THEA-360W Modern Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theatrical literature and forms from the late 19th century well-made plays, Realism, Expressionism, Futurism and Symbolism to Epic theatre and the Theatre of the Absurd. Playwrights such as Henrik Ibsen, Bernard Shaw, Anton Chekhov, Eugene O'Neill, Bertolt Brecht, Samuel Beckett and others will be studied. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of Modern Drama. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-360W)

THEA-362W Contemporary Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Students will begin with post-World War II dramatic works and move sequentially to the present day. Some areas of attention will be the "angry young men," metadrama, gender race and ethnicity, the "new brutalism," and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus will be on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne, Edward Albee, Edward Bond, José Rivera, Martin McDonagh, Tony Kushner, Sarah Kane, Suzan Lori-Parks, Nilo Cruz, Moisés Kaufman, Sarah Ruhl and others will be studied. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-362W)

THEA-370X Special Topics in Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A study of specific topics related to theatre including Movement for the Performer, Playwriting, Set Design, Lighting Design, and Costume Design. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350EW FILA general education: fine arts and music & experiential learning

THEA-450 Theatre Capstone

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A formal capstone experience focused on the student's area of concentration. Defined through consultation with the theatre faculty, the capstone will outline and realize a body of theatrical work and presentation. Focus could be on acting, design (set, light, costume), directing a fully realized theatre production, as well as the writing of a full-length play or a significant project in historical research and writing. Projects must be submitted and approved by theatre faculty prior to the student's final year of study. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

THEA-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for no more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

THEA-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the honors project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The project advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.