Academic Catalog

2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

Sociology

App View

Majors

Sociology Major

Minors

Crime and Justice Minor

Cultural Studies Minor

Social Work Minor

The Department of Sociology offers a broad range of courses leading to a bachelor of arts with a major in sociology. Social work, crime and justice, and cultural studies minors are options for students majoring in any discipline. Each year, our graduates go into a variety of careers and graduate programs in the social sciences, human services, education, the legal professions, criminal justice, government, business and communications. The department places a strong emphasis upon developing skills in interpretation, writing, research and data analysis that are broadly transferable among many professional vocations. Many sociology courses are taught in an interactive format, in which student contributions are central to class sessions. Subjects include anthropology, cultural studies, group dynamics, criminology, inequality, family, race and ethnicity, social theory, and both quantitative and qualitative research and data analysis. The program features a balanced emphasis upon theoretical issues and practical skills; a senior practicum that is very flexible, with a strong reputation in local and regional organizations; a multi-function departmental computer lab; and a curriculum structure that invites our majors to consider minors in related disciplines and opportunities for study abroad.

Sociology Major

Degree Type Offered: B.A. Major

Consists of 36 credit hours including the following courses:

SOC-101 Sociological Imagination

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Introduction to the sociological imagination, with a critical examination of social issues, individual experiences, and the potential for social change. Topics include the nature and impact of culture and social structure, inequality, social institutions, identity, social interaction, and the historical context of knowledge and relationships. Methods of sociological investigation and interpretation are also emphasized. This course is offered in a traditional survey and special topics format. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: social sciences

SOC-301 Classical Social Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Survey of classical and contemporary sociological theory, including the works of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead, Erving Goffman, Harold Garfunkel and others. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-302W Contemporary Social Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of contemporary sociological theory, including the works of Erving Goffman, Harold Garfinkel, The Frankfurt School, Bourdieu and others. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, and SOC-301 or permission of instructor FILA general education: writing intensive

SOC-321 Qualitative and Ethnographic Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Investigation of the practical, theoretical, and ethical issues involved in interpretive, field-based research. Specific research methods addressed include participant observation, interviews, action, research, case studies, multimedia analysis and ethnography. Hands-on experience includes students developing and conducting original field research projects. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-322 Methods of Research and Data Analysis I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Scientific methods and their application in the study of social phenomena, with an emphasis upon survey research. Topics include the relation between theory and research, defining and operationalizing a research problem, questionnaire construction, research design alternatives, sampling, measurement, and elementary data analysis and reporting utilizing the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Prerequisites: SOC-101 and MATH-140 or PSY-300

SOC-323 Methods of Research and Data Analysis II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

The application of scientific research methods to specific research problems. Various measurement, scaling, and statistical techniques are utilized to address research problems defined by the students. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is used to analyze data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and other existing data sets. The course culminates in a major research paper that is presented in oral and written form. Prerequisite: SOC-322

SOC-401X Community Action

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Senior capstone course offering action-based research with the local community. Students engage both community and social change literature. Topics will vary depending on student interest. Prerequisites: ENG-110 and SOC-101 FILA general education: experiential learning

MATH-140 Introduction to Statistics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Basic descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Statistical computer software is used to analyze data. Prerequisites: MATH-118, MATH-110, MATH-115, or satisfactory performance on placement test

-or-

PSY-300 Measurement and Statistics

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduction to basic principles of data analysis. Topics include data distributions, preparation of data and graphs, measurement of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students develop expertise using SPSS and Excel through lab experiences and a summative group project. Prerequisite: PSY-230

And four additional SOC courses approved by the department.

Crime and Justice Minor

Degree Type Offered: Minor

Consists of 24 credit hours including the following courses:

SOC-101 Sociological Imagination

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Introduction to the sociological imagination, with a critical examination of social issues, individual experiences, and the potential for social change. Topics include the nature and impact of culture and social structure, inequality, social institutions, identity, social interaction, and the historical context of knowledge and relationships. Methods of sociological investigation and interpretation are also emphasized. This course is offered in a traditional survey and special topics format. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: social sciences

SOC-211 Criminology

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theories pertaining to the causes of crime and treatment of offenders. Theories of violent and property crimes (including "white-collar" crimes) are explored. Critical analysis of the social, political and cultural context of the justice system in the United States of America, with a special emphasis on questions of justice, fairness and equality are also undertaken. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-412 Adjudication and Corrections: Existing And Alternate Strategies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Critical evaluation of structures of adjudication, sentencing and corrections in the United States. Includes an examination of alternative approaches to justice and reconciliation, such as community-based rehabilitation, victim/offender conflict mediation, et. Various strategies for community reintegration are also explored. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-483X Senior Practicum in Crime and Justice

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Capstone course for the Crime and Justice minor. Students gain direct experience with the field in agencies of law enforcement, courts or law firms, and corrective/rehabilitation/community restoration. The practicum requires 120 hours of field participation over the semester, weekly journals and a final substantive, scholarly paper. Prerequisites: At least two courses completed from SOC 211, 367 or 412, and one course from the crime and justice minor electives, or permission of the instructor. FILA general education: experiential learning

And four courses from the following :

SOC-312 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analysis of juvenile crime and its connections to family structures, peer groups and the educational system, as well as gender, race and class. Trends in juvenile corrections are examined along with current debates on reform. Special topics include gangs, juvenile detention, probation, child advocates, waiver to adult courts and hospitalization. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-313 Gender, Crime and Justice

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Investigation of the interaction between gender and social control in the United States and cross-culturally. The gendered nature of criminal activity is examined empirically and theoretically. The justice system, including the correctional treatment of women, is examined for its relationship to historical shifts in the status and treatment of women. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-314 World Just Systems

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Comparative study of justice systems derived from major legal traditions. The development and application of these systems is examined, with an emphasis on historical trends and social forces that shape them. Comparative themes include the role of political power, public perceptions, systems of morality, constructions of guilt, and corrections philosophies. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-315 Public Security and Insecurity

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines perceptions of security and danger in America since the early 20th century and their effect on the balance between public safety and individual liberty. Examples include organized crime, labor conflict, the communist threat, youth gangs, drugs and terrorism. The role of "moral entrepreneurs," special interest groups, mass media, intelligence and surveillance, and political manipulation are explored. The balance of public safety and individual liberty is central to exploration throughout the course. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-335 Immigrants in the Shenandoah Valley

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the growing ethnic diversity in the Shenandoah Valley through study of contemporary theories and research on immigration. Hands-on field experience includes first-hand interaction with local immigrants and is particularly beneficial for students seeking Spanish language, intercultural, and/or service-learning experience. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC/PHIL-367 Conflict Transformation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Broad introduction to the field, familiarizes students with conflict and practical approaches to its transformation. Personal communication and conflict styles, negotiation skills, interpersonal mediation, and facilitation of group decision-making and problem-solving strategies are examined. Participation in discussions, exercises, analyses, role-plays and simulations frame the course. In addition to the regularly scheduled meeting times, one Saturday session is included. Prerequisite: SOC-101

COMM-410E Communication Law and Ethics in a Digital Age

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analytical survey of ethical and legal issues pertaining to communication professionals, focusing on the new digital media landscape. Issues explored include First Amendments rights, public affairs journalism, copyright, defamation, obscenity, censorship, licensing, corporate and governmental communications, and the Digital Millennium Act. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

PHIL-320E Professional Ethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Pressing issues confronting professionals in a technological era. Utilizing the insights of philosophical and religious ethics, the course examines the responsibilities of the professional person in business, medicine, law education, the ministry, and other fields. Problems considered include confidentiality, accountability, whistleblowing, governmental regulation, and ethical codes. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG 110 and junior or senior standing FILA general education: philosophy or religion and ethical reasoning

PSCI-355 Constitutional Law of Civil Rights and Liberties

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the development of US Supreme Court decisions in the areas of civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include first amendment rights to freedom of speech, press, and assembly, due process rights, and rights to equal protection. This course also considers the First Amendment as a site for interfaith dialogue. Alternate years: offered 2016-2017

PSCI-420W International Law & Organization

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Explores the nature of international law and its similarities and differences with domestic law. Examines the institutions, rules, and organizations that provide the context for global interactions in an increasingly globalizing world. Case studies include issues such as human rights, the International Criminal Court, the World Trade Organization and the World Bank, and International Monetary Fund. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive Offered alternate years

PSY-340 Public Mental Health

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Exposes students to a broad view of public mental health and psychology in the public interest. Stimulates the interest of future researchers, clinicians, and policy makers toward improvement of public mental health. Specific attention is given to discerning science from pseudoscience in the practice of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY-310 or permission of instructor

Cultural Studies Minor

Degree Type Offered: Minor

Consists of 18 credit hours including the following courses:

SOC-232 Cultural Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

An introduction to the theories and concepts in the interdisciplinary field of cultural studies, with special emphasis on the political economy and identity politics of contemporary American college campuses. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350

SOC-431EX Public Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

A seminar comprised of weekly class outings to engage critically and comprehensively with public culture in all its forms, deepening understanding of various cultural theories through direct exposure to a variety of public cultural events, institutions, and texts. Readings will be selected to correspond with these class outings, and students will be expected to reflect on, as well as analyze, their experiences in public culture through writing assignments and semester-long projects relating to cultural change. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110 and senior standing FILA general education: experiential learning and ethical reasoning

And four courses (at least 3 credits from each category) from the following electives:

Note: Courses for the minor must be taken in at least three different departments. No more than one May Term course will count toward the minor.

Cultural Theory

ART-300W Modern & Post-Modern Art

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Critical study of the visual arts of the last 100 years with emphasis on understanding the implications of the concepts we know as modernism and postmodernism. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350; ENG 110 FILA general Education: fine arts & music and writing intensive

COMM-230 Communication Technologies: History, Culture, and Society

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An introduction to the history and influence of communication technology in society. The class will explore the various social, political, cultural, and economic impacts of new communication technology. Major topics include: the origins of writing, printing, photography, film, the telegraph and telephone, radio, television, and the internet.

COMM-240 Contemporary Media Industries

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines how electronic media industries have changed the way we produce and consume media products. The course will examine how the digital age has impacted notions of interactivity, virtual space, media production, networks and credibility. Particular attention will be paid to the social, economic and political implications of these changes.

ENG-200 Introduction to English Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

An introductory methods course for the English majors and minors. Surveys a variety of rhetorical and critical theories, their terminology and their application to a variety of texts in different genres. Modes of writing for diverse audiences are also practiced.

PHIL-333W Contemporary Philosophy

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Developments in the 20th and 21st century Western philosophy are analyzed using primary texts from both Analytic and Continental traditions. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: philosophy or religion and writing intensive Offered alternate years

PHIL-420W Postmodernism

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analyzes philosophically the eras of the 20th century considered "modernism" and "postmodernism." Some key ideas of relativity, literary criticism, modern warfare, social norms, and ethical values from art, literature, sciences, social sciences, and philosophy. Authors from the movements called existentialism, structuralism, deconstructionism, feminism, pragmatism, et al. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: philosophy or religion and writing intensive Offered alternate years

PSCI-401E Contemporary Political Thought

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the origins and development of contemporary notions of freedom, democracy and equality from Nietzsche to contemporary political philosophy. Topics include liberalism, libertarianism and post-modern political thought. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: philosophy or religion and ethical reasoning Offered alternate years

SOC-302W Contemporary Social Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of contemporary sociological theory, including the works of Erving Goffman, Harold Garfinkel, The Frankfurt School, Bourdieu and others. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, and SOC-301 or permission of instructor FILA general education: writing intensive

SOC-331 Cultural Theory at the Movies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Introduction to a diverse set of perspectives on culture and society using movies as a medium. Important lenses in cultural studies including critical theory, postmodernism, postcolonial theory, feminism/critical race theory, and psychoanalysis are introduced through "textual" examination of 21st-century films across the global landscape. This is less a film class than a survey of major contemporary theories in the humanities and social sciences. Highly recommended for students considering graduate studies in the humanities or social sciences, or for anyone interested in developing a critical viewpoint on films and culture in general. Students should be prepared to view challenging films that may depict violence, sexual situations, substance abuse and/or strong language. Prerequisite: SOC-101 or permission of instructor

THEA/ENG-362W Contemporary Drama

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Contemporary theatrical forms of American and British drama. Students will begin with post-World War II dramatic works and move sequentially to the present day. Some areas of attention will be the "angry young men," metadrama, gender race and ethnicity, the "new brutalism," and contemporary docudrama. Particular focus will be on how play texts engage with the cultural and historical moment of their creation. The goals of this course are for students to gain an understanding of the scope, history, techniques and influence of contemporary drama. Playwrights such as John Osborne, Edward Albee, Edward Bond, José Rivera, Martin McDonagh, Tony Kushner, Sarah Kane, Suzan Lori-Parks, Nilo Cruz, Moisés Kaufman, Sarah Ruhl and others will be studied. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: literature and writing intensive Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENG-362W)

Cultural Politics

COMM-335 Communicating Sex and Gender

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Students will develop theoretical and practical understandings of the role of sex and gender in verbal and nonverbal communication, friendships, families, romantic relationships and professional relationships. This course also examines the issues of technology, health, power and violence as they related to sex and gender. Alternate years: offered 2018-2019

COMM-340 Representations of Gender, Race & Class

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examines the media's role in creating and re-creating our understanding of gender, race, and class. Includes a historical perspective, and traces how these representations have changed over time, the forces that have affected representations of gender, race and class, and the current state of their representation in the media. A field trip to at least one museum in Washington, D.C. is planned, depending upon exhibits available at the time (e.g. National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian's American History Museum). Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

ENG-221 The Images of "folk" in Literature

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces students to the concept of folk groups and the ways they have been represented to mainstream cultures through the media of film and literature. Explores literature in conjunction with viewing of film and television depictions of "the folk" as well as documentary films made by folklorists. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: global dynamics FILA alternate years

ENG-243 Native American Literature and Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Anthropological survey of Native North American and Meso-American cultures, examining features such as traditional subsistence patterns, kinship structures, religious beliefs and practices, social and political structures, artistic expression, and intellectual history. Focuses on the literary heritage of Native American cultures, beginning with the oral tradition and storytelling, and continuing on to the "Native American Renaissance", the proliferation of Native American authors and poets that began in the 1960s and continues to the present. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: world cultures Offered alternate years

FREN-350 Special Topics in Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Study of specific topics related to the French language, culture and civilization. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Taught in French. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350; and FREN-202 or permission of instructor FILA general education: world cultures

HIST-335 Women's History in Asia

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Explores women's histories in Asia. Stresses the construction of gender norms and their evolution over time and encourages comparison of women's lives and experiences across various cultural contexts in Asia. Topics include women's political rights and participation, women's education and literacy, women's sexuality and reproduction, and women's work. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: global dynamics Alternate years: offered 2019-2020

PHIL-322EW Ethics and Identity

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces ethical issues related to gender, race, and class. Surveys the development of identity-related critiques of traditional ethical theories and examines how the concept of "the good life" is related to identity. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 and SOC-101 or PSCI/SOC-205 FILA general education: philosophy or religion, ethical reasoning and writing intensive Offered alternate years

PSCI/SOC-205 Global Identities

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Interdisciplinary exploration of the power and dynamics of human similarities and differences on a global scale. Covers globalization from the perspective of identity and difference, and provides opportunities to question contemporary assumptions, values and patterns of behavior with the goal of making global interactions more constructive ad more peaceful. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: global dynamics

PSCI-332 Women & Politics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Explores the role of women in American and global politics in order to understand the role of identity, institutions and social movements in democracy. Topics include women's influence on the development of the modern American welfare state, feminism, public policy issues of special importance to women, and social movement strategies. Offered alternate years

SOC-233 Social History of Jazz in America

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines how jazz music has mirrored the social history of the American people, reflecting ethnic and racial influences, historic events, and cultural change. Examines the history, styles and techniques of American jazz through lecture, audio and video recordings, and live demonstrations. Increases the appreciation and enjoyment of jazz. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music (Cross-listed as MUS-233)

SOC-333 Racial and Ethnic Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

The nature of racial relations and inequalities in American society, including their historical origins and relationship to Western capitalist development. The ethnic composition of contemporary American society, impact of legal and illegal immigration patterns, dynamics of modern structures and institutions, the Civil Rights Movement, inter-ethnic conflicts and attitudes, multiculturalism and status of affirmative action are analyzed in the context of national and global social change. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics

SOC-334 Gender and Sexuality Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Introduction to a variety of conceptual frameworks and theoretical lenses relating to human gender and sexualities, including social constructionism, political economy, and cultural studies. A critical, global, historical, and sociological approach will be emphasized to unpack gendered ad sexualized social structures like patriarchy, heterosexism, and hegemonic masculinity. Special attention will be paid to social movements and challenges to power/resource inequalities made by gender and sexuality-based minority groups. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC-335 Immigrants in the Shenandoah Valley

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the growing ethnic diversity in the Shenandoah Valley through study of contemporary theories and research on immigration. Hands-on field experience includes first-hand interaction with local immigrants and is particularly beneficial for students seeking Spanish language, intercultural, and/or service-learning experience. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC-361 Development and Underdevelopment in the Modern World

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Dilemmas, tensions, and theoretical and policy issues related to the position of Third World countries in the modern world. Questions of urbanization, industrialization, modernization, westernization, and distribution of economic resources are discussed. Various theories of development and underdevelopment are critically examined. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics

SPAN-350 Special Topics in Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Study of specific topics related to the Hispanic language, culture and civilization. Recent topics include, Hispanics in the U.S. Regional Studies, etc. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN-202 or permission of instructor

Cultural Change

ART-316 Metal Sculpture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Studio exploration of solving and designing and personal expression in metal fabrication using arc welding, plasma cutting, oxy/acetylene welding and cutting, cold metal work, mechanical fastenings, and MIG welding.

ART-322 Web Design and Development

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Design and construct websites using current HTML and CSS standards and digital tools including Brackets, Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Emphasis on design process, content development and professional workflows.

ART-323 Graphic Design

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

A studio based exploration into visual communication with typography and images using Adobe Creative Cloud applications. Emphasis is placed on the design process and creative thinking. Corequisite: ENG-110 FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-335 Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

A project based investigation of the materials, practices, and aesthetics of painting with emphasis on how these three elements work together to create compelling 2-D colored images. This course provides practical and theoretical foundations for four hundred-level courses in drawing and painting and for independent work in these media. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-344 Photography

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn to skillfully and confidently use digital cameras and software including Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop to create compelling photographs. Emphasis is placed on composition, visual communication and creative process in a contemporary photography context. Note: Students must provide a digital camera capable of manual exposure and Raw image capture. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

ART-347 Videography I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Learn the fundamentals of video production including camera operation and control, stationary and moving camera techniques, audio recording, natural and artificial lighting, framing and shot structure, and use of nonlinear editing software. Students will complete hands-on exercises and assignments designed to build strong visual and technical skills needed to produce effective videos and short films. Corequisites: COMM-100, ENG-110, FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

COMM/ENG-255W Introduction to News Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Teaches students the basic skills of researching, investigating and writing in a variety of formats. Emphasis on identification of the writing structures used by contemporary media writers and utilization of these structures in original pieces researched and written by the students. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as PWR-255W)

COMM/ENG-305 Multimedia Reporting and Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Builds on the skills-oriented approach of COMM/PWR-255W by putting theory behind the practice of writing. Through individual and group writing projects, students work toward understanding the increasingly complex definition of news, its blurring line with entertainment, and the dynamic interplay between technologies and audiences. Prerequisite: COMM/PWR-255W or permission of instructor Offered alternate years: 2018-2019 (Cross-listed as PWR-305)

COMM-306 Investigative Journalism & Documentary

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Students in this course will learn and apply investigative journalism and history research methodologies and techniques to produce long-form journalistic materials. This course will teach students how to identify, collect, analyze, reproduce, preserve, and report on historical and difficult-to-access data and artifacts. Students will learn documentary production techniques and long-form journalism writing.

COMM-420 Political Campaigning in Virtual Environments

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduces the range of communication practices that characterize contemporary political campaigns. Students will process existing understandings of political communication theory in order to design and implement a semester-long campaign project.

FREN-315 Special Topics in Writing

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Provides the tools to develop and enhance students' writing skills. Focuses on the skills involved in writing in a second language. Through a variety of writing techniques and reading material, such as newspaper and magazine articles, essays, among others, students broaden their vocabulary and learn how to write creatively and critically. May be taken more than once provided different topics are covered. Prerequisites: FREN-202 or permission of the instructor

THEA-200 Theatre Production: Costumes and Scenery

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course is an introduction to the many elements involved in Western theatre production, with emphases on two of the primary areas of design, construction and implementation: scenery and costumes, and an integration with stage management. The class will explore concepts, techniques, equipment and materials necessary for a successful theatrical production, emphasizing problem solving through research, experimentation, and collaboration. Students will be challenged to engage and understand the interrelationships between the various elements involved in mounting a stage production, and how these elements relate to and affect the other aspects of dramatic art. Previous experience with theatre is not necessary. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-225 Scenic Painting

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Practical study of the various theories, techniques and materials used in scenic painting. Focusing on theory and practice, encompasses a systematic approach to painting theatrical scenery. Emphasis on traditional scene painting techniques, including material selection (brushes and paints) and their practical application through design reproductions and faux finishes, as well as the tools and paints that have been developed to support those techniques. Students learn how the theories and techniques of scenic painting have changed historically, and how these unique changes have impacted the materials and techniques utilized by the scenic painter. Engages with the unique qualities of different types of paint noting how they perform on different types of materials, and how that knowledge can be used to create effective results. Projects include painting stage drops, creating stained glass windows with paint, faux marble and wood grain finishes, photos and designer renderings. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

THEA-310 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (acting, Movement)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Production laboratory requiring intense involvement with the process of translating a play text from script to performance. Requires the student to work independently and as an ensemble interpreting, rehearsing and performing a play. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisites: Audition and permission of instructor

THEA-311 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (Lighting, Costumes and Makeup, Scenic Painting, Scenery and Props, Technical Direction, and Sound)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of technology associated with lighting, costumes and makeup, scenery and properties, scenic painting, technical direction, and sound as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest designer to interpret, create, and implement effective designs. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-312 Production Laboratory/Applied Performance (stage Management, Dramaturgy, Assistant Directing)

Credits: 1 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Application of techniques associated with stage management, dramaturgy, and assistant directing as associated with theatrical production. Requires the student to work independently and with faculty and/or guest artists to interpret, create, and implement effective theatrical performances. Professionalism and dedication to the theatrical process are stressed. In-class and out-of-class work is essential. May be repeated for credit. A maximum of 6 credits in Production Laboratory/Applied Performance may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

THEA-355 Environmental Theatre

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Environmental theatre began in the 1960s in response to the social and political climate of the time. Performers and performance groups pushed the boundaries of what was traditionally thought of as theatre, and as a result, restructured and reinvigorated the fundamental understanding of what performance was and its function within society. Environmental theatre continues to be a powerful vehicle for social commentary. The objective of this course is three-fold: to introduce the student to the cultural, social, and political richness of environmental theatre, including site-specific performance; to provide a historical understanding of the period by highlighting how the original practitioners and their works were directly influenced by cultural events of the time; and, to involve the student in the process of creating and performing their own individual and group site-specific environmental performance piece. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music

Other elective courses, including those from study abroad programs, may be included with departmental approval.

Social Work Minor

Degree Type Offered: Minor

Consists of 21 credit hours in sociology and social work from the following courses:

SOC-254 Introduction to Social Work

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

An overview of the development of social work as a profession with an introduction to the various settings in which social work is practiced. Particular emphasis will be placed on the value orientation and ethical code of the profession and legal issues facing both practitioners and clients. Twenty hours of community service is a component of this course. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-255EX Introduction to Social Welfare Systems

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Traces the origins and development of current social welfare institutions and illuminates the philosophical and ethical considerations undergirding social policy while considering the merits and deficits of current social services. While a primary focus is on the political, economic, and social context of the American welfare system, cross-cultural comparisons will be considered. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110 and SOC-101 FILA general education: ethical reasoning and experiential learning

SOC/FCS-368W Sociology of the Family

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of the human family historically and comparatively in various cultures with major emphasis placed upon the modern American family. Included are such topics as the diversity of family structures, the social construction of emotions, gender expectations and roles, parenting, the life cycle, and family tensions. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, SOC-101 and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as FCS-368W)

SOC-451 Counseling and Personal Development

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Basic counseling skills and models are outlined for students who plan to enter a helping profession. Primary focus is placed on current counseling techniques and strategies. Helping skills such as attending, reflecting, clarifying, empathizing, supporting, examining feedback, confronting, and facilitating group process are treated. Goal setting, decision making, self-awareness, and referral techniques are also included. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-481X Field Experience in Social Welfare

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides social work experience through placement in a human service agency. Placement may be arranged for 12 weeks of a full-time experience during the normal semester or on a part-time basis for three credits. The experience is under careful supervision of both the agency and the Sociology department. The student's interest influences the choice of an agency. One hundred twenty hours of participation are required for three credits and 480 hours are required for 12 credits. Prerequisites: ENG 110, SOC 254, 255, and 451, or permission of the instructor FILA general education: experiential learning

And two courses from the following :

SOC-211 Criminology

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theories pertaining to the causes of crime and treatment of offenders. Theories of violent and property crimes (including "white-collar" crimes) are explored. Critical analysis of the social, political and cultural context of the justice system in the United States of America, with a special emphasis on questions of justice, fairness and equality are also undertaken. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-256 Group Process

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

The study of the behavior of individuals in small groups with a focus on the development of interpersonal communication skills. Topics include facilitation, leadership styles, decision making, problem solving, and mediation. Attention will be directed at how groups form and change over time; how conflict occurs and is managed; how roles and norms develop; and the nature of power, conformity and deviance in groups. The relevance of this work to applied settings will also be discussed. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-312 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analysis of juvenile crime and its connections to family structures, peer groups and the educational system, as well as gender, race and class. Trends in juvenile corrections are examined along with current debates on reform. Special topics include gangs, juvenile detention, probation, child advocates, waiver to adult courts and hospitalization. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-333 Racial and Ethnic Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

The nature of racial relations and inequalities in American society, including their historical origins and relationship to Western capitalist development. The ethnic composition of contemporary American society, impact of legal and illegal immigration patterns, dynamics of modern structures and institutions, the Civil Rights Movement, inter-ethnic conflicts and attitudes, multiculturalism and status of affirmative action are analyzed in the context of national and global social change. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics

SOC-335 Immigrants in the Shenandoah Valley

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the growing ethnic diversity in the Shenandoah Valley through study of contemporary theories and research on immigration. Hands-on field experience includes first-hand interaction with local immigrants and is particularly beneficial for students seeking Spanish language, intercultural, and/or service-learning experience. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC/PHIL-367 Conflict Transformation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Broad introduction to the field, familiarizes students with conflict and practical approaches to its transformation. Personal communication and conflict styles, negotiation skills, interpersonal mediation, and facilitation of group decision-making and problem-solving strategies are examined. Participation in discussions, exercises, analyses, role-plays and simulations frame the course. In addition to the regularly scheduled meeting times, one Saturday session is included. Prerequisite: SOC-101

FCS-345 Child Development

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Examine issues related to physical, cognitive and socio-emotional development of the child from conception through early adolescence. Students will develop theoretical and practical knowledge of child development concepts. Provisions are made for observing and working with preschool children. Prerequisite: junior standing

PSY-340 Public Mental Health

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Exposes students to a broad view of public mental health and psychology in the public interest. Stimulates the interest of future researchers, clinicians, and policy makers toward improvement of public mental health. Specific attention is given to discerning science from pseudoscience in the practice of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY-310 or permission of instructor

Courses

SOC-101 Sociological Imagination

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Introduction to the sociological imagination, with a critical examination of social issues, individual experiences, and the potential for social change. Topics include the nature and impact of culture and social structure, inequality, social institutions, identity, social interaction, and the historical context of knowledge and relationships. Methods of sociological investigation and interpretation are also emphasized. This course is offered in a traditional survey and special topics format. Corequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: social sciences

SOC-201 General Anthropology

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Human biology and evolution as seen through genetics, races, archaeology, and prehistory; and the diversity and uniformity of human behavior as seen through cross-cultural studies. The growth and spread of culture in time and space are reviewed; the impact of urbanization, industrialization and technological trends on the nature and quality of man's life are examined. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: world cultures (Credit may not be received for both SOC-201 and SOC-202).

SOC-202 Cultural Anthropology

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Focused on the cultural branch of anthropology, topics include how the different contexts in which humans live have produced variations in belief, food, dress, music, kinship, gender, visual aesthetics, language, and other cultural aspects of ordinary life. Also introduces ethnography, and anthropological way of doing research and writing, in order to understand cultural difference. (Credit may not be received for both SOC 201 and 202)

SOC-203 Social Problems

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Problems of population growth, environment and resource depletion, alcoholism and drug addiction, crime and violence, inequity and poverty, unemployment, alienation and several others will be studies. Development of public awareness, role of social movements, theoretical approaches, value conflicts, interest groups ad power struggles, and examination of proposed solutions will also be included.

SOC-205 Global Identities

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Interdisciplinary exploration of the power and dynamics of human similarities and differences on a global scale. Covers globalization from the perspective of identity and difference, and provides opportunities to question contemporary assumptions, values and patterns of behavior with the goal of making global interactions more constructive and more peaceful. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: global dynamics

SOC-208E Food Politics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course is an introduction to a variety of political, ethical and social justice issues surrounding local, national and global food systems. It includes discussions of food policy, food security, food waste, food and farm workers' rights, and the environmental impact and sustainability of our current food production systems. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general education: global dynamics and ethical reasoning

SOC-211 Criminology

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of theories pertaining to the causes of crime and treatment of offenders. Theories of violent and property crimes (including "white-collar" crimes) are explored. Critical analysis of the social, political and cultural context of the justice system in the United States of America, with a special emphasis on questions of justice, fairness and equality are also undertaken. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-232 Cultural Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

An introduction to the theories and concepts in the interdisciplinary field of cultural studies, with special emphasis on the political economy and identity politics of contemporary American college campuses. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350

SOC-233 Social History of Jazz in America

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines how jazz music has mirrored the social history of the American people, reflecting ethnic and racial influences, historic events, and cultural change. Examines the history, styles and techniques of American jazz through lecture, audio and video recordings, and live demonstrations. Increases the appreciation and enjoyment of jazz. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: fine arts and music (Cross-listed as MUS-233)

SOC-254 Introduction to Social Work

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

An overview of the development of social work as a profession with an introduction to the various settings in which social work is practiced. Particular emphasis will be placed on the value orientation and ethical code of the profession and legal issues facing both practitioners and clients. Twenty hours of community service is a component of this course. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-255EX Introduction to Social Welfare Systems

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Traces the origins and development of current social welfare institutions and illuminates the philosophical and ethical considerations undergirding social policy while considering the merits and deficits of current social services. While a primary focus is on the political, economic, and social context of the American welfare system, cross-cultural comparisons will be considered. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110 and SOC-101 FILA general education: ethical reasoning and experiential learning

SOC-256 Group Process

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

The study of the behavior of individuals in small groups with a focus on the development of interpersonal communication skills. Topics include facilitation, leadership styles, decision making, problem solving, and mediation. Attention will be directed at how groups form and change over time; how conflict occurs and is managed; how roles and norms develop; and the nature of power, conformity and deviance in groups. The relevance of this work to applied settings will also be discussed. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-301 Classical Social Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Survey of classical and contemporary sociological theory, including the works of Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead, Erving Goffman, Harold Garfunkel and others. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-302W Contemporary Social Theory

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of contemporary sociological theory, including the works of Erving Goffman, Harold Garfinkel, The Frankfurt School, Bourdieu and others. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, and SOC-301 or permission of instructor FILA general education: writing intensive

SOC-312 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Analysis of juvenile crime and its connections to family structures, peer groups and the educational system, as well as gender, race and class. Trends in juvenile corrections are examined along with current debates on reform. Special topics include gangs, juvenile detention, probation, child advocates, waiver to adult courts and hospitalization. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-313 Gender, Crime and Justice

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Investigation of the interaction between gender and social control in the United States and cross-culturally. The gendered nature of criminal activity is examined empirically and theoretically. The justice system, including the correctional treatment of women, is examined for its relationship to historical shifts in the status and treatment of women. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-314 World Just Systems

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Comparative study of justice systems derived from major legal traditions. The development and application of these systems is examined, with an emphasis on historical trends and social forces that shape them. Comparative themes include the role of political power, public perceptions, systems of morality, constructions of guilt, and corrections philosophies. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-315 Public Security and Insecurity

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines perceptions of security and danger in America since the early 20th century and their effect on the balance between public safety and individual liberty. Examples include organized crime, labor conflict, the communist threat, youth gangs, drugs and terrorism. The role of "moral entrepreneurs," special interest groups, mass media, intelligence and surveillance, and political manipulation are explored. The balance of public safety and individual liberty is central to exploration throughout the course. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-321 Qualitative and Ethnographic Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Investigation of the practical, theoretical, and ethical issues involved in interpretive, field-based research. Specific research methods addressed include participant observation, interviews, action, research, case studies, multimedia analysis and ethnography. Hands-on experience includes students developing and conducting original field research projects. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-322 Methods of Research and Data Analysis I

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Scientific methods and their application in the study of social phenomena, with an emphasis upon survey research. Topics include the relation between theory and research, defining and operationalizing a research problem, questionnaire construction, research design alternatives, sampling, measurement, and elementary data analysis and reporting utilizing the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Prerequisites: SOC-101 and MATH-140 or PSY-300

SOC-323 Methods of Research and Data Analysis II

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

The application of scientific research methods to specific research problems. Various measurement, scaling, and statistical techniques are utilized to address research problems defined by the students. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is used to analyze data from the General Social Survey (GSS) and other existing data sets. The course culminates in a major research paper that is presented in oral and written form. Prerequisite: SOC-322

SOC-331 Cultural Theory at the Movies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Introduction to a diverse set of perspectives on culture and society using movies as a medium. Important lenses in cultural studies including critical theory, postmodernism, postcolonial theory, feminism/critical race theory, and psychoanalysis are introduced through "textual" examination of 21st-century films across the global landscape. This is less a film class than a survey of major contemporary theories in the humanities and social sciences. Highly recommended for students considering graduate studies in the humanities or social sciences, or for anyone interested in developing a critical viewpoint on films and culture in general. Students should be prepared to view challenging films that may depict violence, sexual situations, substance abuse and/or strong language. Prerequisite: SOC-101 or permission of instructor

SOC-332 The Sociology of the Living Dead: Zombie Films and the Apocalyptic in American Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Examination of the sociological implications of the Zombie film genre, with emphasis on how the films may reflect cultural tensions between individualism and community, declining trust in government and other civic institutions, and the pervasiveness and influence of apocalyptic and millennial visions in American culture. Seminar discussion and analytic writing cultivate students' ability interpret this cultural phenomenon as well as others, more generally. Prerequisite: SOC 101

SOC-333 Racial and Ethnic Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

The nature of racial relations and inequalities in American society, including their historical origins and relationship to Western capitalist development. The ethnic composition of contemporary American society, impact of legal and illegal immigration patterns, dynamics of modern structures and institutions, the Civil Rights Movement, inter-ethnic conflicts and attitudes, multiculturalism and status of affirmative action are analyzed in the context of national and global social change. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics

SOC-334 Gender and Sexuality Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Introduction to a variety of conceptual frameworks and theoretical lenses relating to human gender and sexualities, including social constructionism, political economy, and cultural studies. A critical, global, historical, and sociological approach will be emphasized to unpack gendered ad sexualized social structures like patriarchy, heterosexism, and hegemonic masculinity. Special attention will be paid to social movements and challenges to power/resource inequalities made by gender and sexuality-based minority groups. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC-335 Immigrants in the Shenandoah Valley

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of the growing ethnic diversity in the Shenandoah Valley through study of contemporary theories and research on immigration. Hands-on field experience includes first-hand interaction with local immigrants and is particularly beneficial for students seeking Spanish language, intercultural, and/or service-learning experience. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics Offered alternate years

SOC-336X Immigrant Food Cultures of New York City

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

How various immigrant groups in New York City have negotiated their traditional food cultures upon arrival in the United States. The first three days of the course will be spent on the Bridgewater College campus followed by five days in New York City being guided to various ethnic immigrant communities around the city and outer boroughs to explore restaurants, community centers, food markets and historic and culturally significant sites, as well as to meet community members involved in preserving the group's traditional food culture. Prerequisite: FILA-150 or FILA-350 FILA general education: global dynamics and experiential learning

SOC-338 Introduction to Material Culture Studies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Introduces students to techniques for examination of objects and artifacts through the study of important texts, hands-on experience, on-site visits to museums, buildings and cultural landscapes. Topics include vernacular architecture, cultural geography, popular design, technology, folk life and archaeology. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-350 Social Inequality

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course is an examination of patterns of social stratification and important theories of the class structure. Stress is placed upon analysis of the American class system. Acquaintance with major research in the field is emphasized. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-361 Development and Underdevelopment in the Modern World

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Dilemmas, tensions, and theoretical and policy issues related to the position of Third World countries in the modern world. Questions of urbanization, industrialization, modernization, westernization, and distribution of economic resources are discussed. Various theories of development and underdevelopment are critically examined. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: global dynamics

SOC-362 Sociology of the Caribbean: Case Study Of Jamaica

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

A sociological exploration of the Caribbean with Jamaica as the case study. The course examines the political, economic, and social aspects of Jamaica in the context of the Caribbean region and in comparison with the rest of the world. Jamaican history, language, race, social class, ethnicity, and the impact of the tourist industry are explored. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-363 Cultures of Japan

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

An historical and cultural study of Japan, with particular attention to religion, government, and the arts. Consideration is given to daily life in Japan and current problems and changes Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: world cultures

SOC-364 Sociology of the African Continent: A Case Study of Zambia

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Sociological exploration of how the geography, climate, colonial history, rural economic development, urbanization, democratization, tribal cleavage and affiliation influence the culture, language, politics, tourism, racial and ethnic relations, education, and family structure of Zambia. As a case study of the African continent, Zambia is used to investigate contemporary African challenges. A 12-day field trip to Zambia focuses on visiting the capital city of Lusaka, the University of Zambia, Nkhanga Rural Region Village library of Lundazi District of Eastern Zambia, the Victoria Falls, and the Luangwa Game Park. Prerequisites: SOC-101, SOC-201, SOC-202 or SOC/PSCI-205 or permission of instructor

SOC-365 Cultures of Africa

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

The racial, social, and cultural history of Africa in ancient and modern times. Attention is given to the impact of urbanization and to African responses to Western values and institutions as carried to the continent by the Colonial powers. Contemporary political and socioeconomic trends and problems. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and SOC-101 FILA general education: world cultures

SOC-366E Sociology of Birth and Death

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of how society supports, controls and constrains our arrival into and departure from the world, revealing the ways that events often assumed to be "natural" are in fact conditioned by social and cultural forces. Special emphasis on the communication of cultural norms regarding birth and death, the impact of advances in medicine and technology, and how birth and death become cultural metaphors for other social phenomena. The course includes an interfaith studies component focused on Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and Native American death rituals. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, and SOC-101 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

SOC-367 Conflict Transformation

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Broad introduction to the field, familiarizes students with conflict and practical approaches to its transformation. Personal communication and conflict styles, negotiation skills, interpersonal mediation, and facilitation of group decision-making and problem-solving strategies are examined. Participation in discussions, exercises, analyses, role-plays and simulations frame the course. In addition to the regularly scheduled meeting times, one Saturday session is included. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-368W Sociology of the Family

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examination of the human family historically and comparatively in various cultures with major emphasis placed upon the modern American family. Included are such topics as the diversity of family structures, the social construction of emotions, gender expectations and roles, parenting, the life cycle, and family tensions. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, SOC-101 and ENG-110 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as FCS-368W)

SOC-369 Studying the American Militia Movement: Guerrillas in Our Midst

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

Explores the genesis of the American militia movement and its current incarnations, employing sociological theories of culture, ideology, social movements, and cultural change to examine the movement and the ways in which it yields insights into some crucial questions about our society ad our social ideals: how we define citizenship, community, and nation; how members of social movements and subcultures create insider-outsider distinctions between themselves and non-members; and the cultural values and symbols upon which social movements draw in order to communicate a vision of America as they see it and as they believe it should be. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-370E Sociology of Religion

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Examination of religion as a powerful force of social cohesion, order, meaning and change in human societies. Special attention will be given to why people are religious or not religious; the growth and decline of religious organizations; religious conversion and loss of faith; the impact of modernity on religion and religious belief, especially among young and emerging adults. The social context in which various religious communities exist and how they shape and are being shaped by their social context will also be investigated. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, and SOC-101 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

SOC-401X Community Action

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Senior capstone course offering action-based research with the local community. Students engage both community and social change literature. Topics will vary depending on student interest. Prerequisites: ENG-110 and SOC-101 FILA general education: experiential learning

SOC-412 Adjudication and Corrections: Existing And Alternate Strategies

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

Critical evaluation of structures of adjudication, sentencing and corrections in the United States. Includes an examination of alternative approaches to justice and reconciliation, such as community-based rehabilitation, victim/offender conflict mediation, et. Various strategies for community reintegration are also explored. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Offered alternate years

SOC-431EX Public Culture

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

A seminar comprised of weekly class outings to engage critically and comprehensively with public culture in all its forms, deepening understanding of various cultural theories through direct exposure to a variety of public cultural events, institutions, and texts. Readings will be selected to correspond with these class outings, and students will be expected to reflect on, as well as analyze, their experiences in public culture through writing assignments and semester-long projects relating to cultural change. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110 and senior standing FILA general education: experiential learning and ethical reasoning

SOC-451 Counseling and Personal Development

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Basic counseling skills and models are outlined for students who plan to enter a helping profession. Primary focus is placed on current counseling techniques and strategies. Helping skills such as attending, reflecting, clarifying, empathizing, supporting, examining feedback, confronting, and facilitating group process are treated. Goal setting, decision making, self-awareness, and referral techniques are also included. Prerequisite: SOC-101

SOC-480 Internship

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides an opportunity for a student to gain field experience in an area related to the student's concentration or career goals. Supervision of an intern is provided by an appropriate faculty member and by a staff member of the agency or business in which the student is an intern. A student who wishes to engage in an internship must consult with the appropriate faculty member at least eight weeks in advance of the start of the term in which the internship is to be completed. A description of the internship, signed by the student and the faculty sponsor, must be filed with the director of internships by the first day of the semester prior to the start of the internship. Approval of each application for an internship is made by the director of internships based upon policies and guidelines as approved by the Council on Education and the faculty. To be considered for an internship, a student must have junior or senior status and at least a 2.00 grade point average. Internships are graded on an S or U basis. A student may enroll in an internship program for 3 credits per semester, and internship credit may be earned in subsequent semesters subject to the limitations that no more than two internships may be pursued in any one agency or business and a maximum of 9 credits in internships may be applied toward graduation.

SOC-481X Field Experience in Social Welfare

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Provides social work experience through placement in a human service agency. Placement may be arranged for 12 weeks of a full-time experience during the normal semester or on a part-time basis for three credits. The experience is under careful supervision of both the agency and the Sociology department. The student's interest influences the choice of an agency. One hundred twenty hours of participation are required for three credits and 480 hours are required for 12 credits. Prerequisites: ENG 110, SOC 254, 255, and 451, or permission of the instructor FILA general education: experiential learning

SOC-482 Proseminar in Social Work Ethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

This independent study may only be taken by those students who are concurrently enrolled in SOC 481X: Field Experience in Social Welfare. In conjunction with the fieldwork placement, provides an advanced forum to discuss the social work profession. Implications of the Social Work Code of Ethics on professional conduct, as well as the inter-agency approaches to social work and social welfare are explored.

SOC-483X Senior Practicum in Crime and Justice

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Capstone course for the Crime and Justice minor. Students gain direct experience with the field in agencies of law enforcement, courts or law firms, and corrective/rehabilitation/community restoration. The practicum requires 120 hours of field participation over the semester, weekly journals and a final substantive, scholarly paper. Prerequisites: At least two courses completed from SOC 211, 367 or 412, and one course from the crime and justice minor electives, or permission of the instructor. FILA general education: experiential learning

SOC-490 Independent Study

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

SOC-491 Research

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

Upon approval of the department and the division head, a student with a cumulative grade point average of 2.20 or better may engage in an independent study or research project. One desiring to pursue independent study or research must submit a written description of the proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. At the end of the semester, the supervising professor files with the registrar a grade for the student and a description of the work accomplished. Credit may be received for not more than three independent studies or research projects.

SOC-499 Honors Project

Credits: 3 Term Offered: All Terms

An honors project is one in which a student researches a subject, by examination of relevant literature or by experimentation or both; the student reports the results in an accurately documented and well-written paper or appropriate representation of the work. Whenever the study deals with the subject of an established course, the student is expected to go well beyond the usual work of the course in research and in assimilation of the results as revealed in the report. Juniors and seniors with a cumulative grade point average of 3.40 or above may register for an honors project. One desiring to pursue an honors project must submit a written description of his or her proposed work to the chair of the appropriate department and to the appropriate division head prior to the last day of the drop and add period for the semester in which the study is to be conducted. Upon the completion of the Honors Project, the student must present an oral defense of his or her project. The final grade must include a satisfactory performance on the oral defense, assessed by a three-faculty member team. The Project Advisor will authorize the make-up of the oral defense team and will assign the final grade on the project. The honors project title will be noted on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to provide a copy of the written paper or appropriate representation of the work to the library in compliance with specifications approved by the Council on Education. The library director arranges for binding and storage.