Academic Catalog

2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog

Wildlife Biology Emphasis

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Degree Type Offered: Emphasis

The wildlife biology emphasis allows students wanting the breadth of the biology or environmental science major to also focus in areas of wildlife biology and management. In this program, students take 11–17 additional credits on top of their major to specialize in wildlife. The program offers directed study in wildlife management and techniques, botany, zoology, and policy and ethics. This program along with the biology or environmental science major and the general education requirements supports students wishing to pursue careers with state and federal agencies, graduate degree programs in wildlife biology, as well as those who wish to pursue Wildlife Biologist Certification through the Wildlife Society.
 
Consists of 23 credits. The requirements are as follows:

Wildlife Management and Techniques

Take one course:

BIOL/ENVR-312W Wildlife Ecology and Management

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

Explores the ecology and management of wildlife with an emphasis on North American mammals and birds. Topics include habitat quality, forestry, nutrition, disease, population dynamics and diversity. Also explores human dimensions in the North American stakeholder model of wildlife management. Lab emphasizes field techniques. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350; ENG-110 and BIOL-111 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as ENVR-312W)

BIOL/ENVR-365 Field Biology & Natural History

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Summer

Field-based course providing a broad overview of techniques and concepts involved in field biology (especially ecology) including basic scientific method and a variety of sampling techniques. Course content also has a strong emphasis on basic natural history as students learn about and experience a wide variety of organisms (e.g. plant, fungi, insects, fish, amphibians, and mammals), ecosystems (e.g. forests, grasslands, wetlands, ponds, and streams) and ecological interactions. Students will also discuss techniques for interpreting/teaching these biological concepts to others. Prerequisite: BIOL-111, or permission of instructor (Cross-listed as ENVR-356)

BIOL/ENVR-402 Conversation Biology

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of the methods used by the public and private sectors to manage the environment and natural resources. Primary emphasis on restoration ecology and conservation biology. Other topics addressed include environmental engineering (e.g. green chemistry and design of pollution control devices), economic considerations in conservation (e.g. conservation land easements and ecotourism), and government regulation. The lab provides students with experience applying standard methods of monitoring biological resources. The lab also provides an opportunity for students to hear talks from environmental experts and to travel to local sites where management activities are occurring. Prerequisites: BIOL-111 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENVR-402)

Molecules, Anatomy and Physiology

Take one course:

BIOL-309 Genetics

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduction to both classical, Mendelian inheritance and molecular genetics with one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL-111 or permission of instructor; CHEM-161 recommended BIOL-216 may not be substituted for BIOL-309

BIOL-311W Animal Physiology

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

Introduction to animal physiology - how animals function at cellular, systems and organismal levels. Knowledge that is acquired in this course serves as an excellent foundation for future postgraduate or professional studies in animal health & management. Course structure: active learning lectures and applied learning labs. Development of scientific thinking and writing are significant components of the course. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, BIOL-110 and BIOL-111, MATH-120 FILA general education: writing intensive

BIOL-325 Molecular Biology of the Cell

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

The molecular basis of cell structure and function. Topics include the chemistry, architecture and analysis of macromolecules, overview of thermodynamics and metabolism, enzymology, genetic processes and controls, recombinant DNA technology, and cell signaling mechanisms. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisites: BIOL-111 and CHEM-161, or permission of instructor Credit may not be received for both BIOL-216 and BIOL-325

BIOL/ENVR-360W Environmental Physiology

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

This course will provide a framework for studying how animals function in their native environments at different stages of their life cycles. Its scope is animal physiology blended with environmental science: principles of physiological mechanisms are examined from the perspective of physiological adaptation in a given environmental context, including specific adaptations to environmental extremes. Course structure: active learning lectures and applied learning labs. Development of critical scientific thinking and scientific writing are significant components of the course. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110, BIOL-110 and BIOL-111, and MATH-120 FILA general education: writing intensive (Cross-listed as ENVR-360W)

BIOL-412 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Comparative study of the major organ systems in vertebrate animals. Lectures examine topics such as the origin and adaptive evolution of vertebrate anatomy and the systematic relationships between vertebrate groups. The lab provides a detailed examination of vertebrate anatomy. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL-111 Offered alternate years

Botany

Take one course:

BIOL-335 Summer Flora

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Summer

Survey of the vascular flora of the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding mountain areas. Field-based course that introduces students to the identification of plants in the field of their ecology. Plant collection and specimen preservation are also included. Prerequisites: BIOL-111

BIOL-340 Botany

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Fall Only

A comprehensive survey of the plant kingdom that will include topics ranging from plant anatomy, physiology, diversity and ecology. Students interested in ecology, forestry and wildlife biology will find this course particularly useful. Three lectures and one lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL-111 Offered alternate years

BIOL-420 Plant Taxonomy

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Broad survey of the diversity and classification of vascular plants. Students will learn to recognize common and important plant families as well as learn to identify local taxa. Traditional and modern methods of taxonomy and systematics are presented. Prerequisite: BIOL-111; BIOL-430 recommended Offered alternate years

Zoology/Organisms

Take two courses:

BIOL-316 Ornithology: the Biology of Birds

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Explores the anatomy, physiology, ecology and behaviors that have produced an extraordinary biodiversity of bird species. The major groups of modern birds are introduced, and their origin and ecology are examined. Students learn to recognize local species in the field and examine them in the lab using the ornithology collections. Suitable for both biology majors and non-majors. Prerequisites: BIOL-100 or BIOL-110 Offered alternate years

BIOL-321 Herpetology

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

An introduction to the study of amphibians and reptiles. Lectures will focus on the origin and evolution of amphibians and reptiles, and on their biology, ecology and conservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomy, anatomy, species identification, and common field techniques used to study these groups. Prerequisite: BIOL-111 Offered alternate years

BIOL-322 Mammalogy

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

A comprehensive survey of mammals. Lectures will focus on phylogenetics, the origin and evolution of mammals and their biology, ecology and conservation. Lab will emphasize taxonomy, species identification and common field techniques used to study mammals. Prerequisite: BIOL-111 Offered alternate years

BIOL/ENVR-433 Biology & Management of Fishes

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Survey of diversity of fish (with an emphasis on freshwater fish of North America). Topics include taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Special emphasis on management of fish populations and diversity in the face of environmental threats including pollution, habitat alteration, overharvest, and invasive species. Lab includes basic ecology and behavior but focuses heavily on common fisheries' techniques. Prerequisites: BIOL/ENVR-301 or BIOL-350 or permission of instructor Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENVR-433)

BIOL-440 Animal Behavior

Credits: 4 Term Offered: Spring Only

Introduction to the theoretical framework and the methodology of animal behavior research. Students examine the causation, development, current function, and evolutionary history of behavior of invertebrates and vertebrates. Integrates concepts and principles from multiple disciplines to understand behaviors such as foraging and predation, mating systems, communication, parental care, social hierarchies, and territoriality. Students also review the history of the field of animal behavior and the contributions that animal behavior research can make to applied disciplines such as environmental conservation, biomedical research, and human psychology. Prerequisites: Any one of the following: BIOL-311, BIOL-314, or BIOL-350, PSY-210, or permission of the instructor Offered alternate years (Cross-listed as ENVR-440)

Policy/Ethics

Take one course:

PHIL-235E Bioethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Confronts a number of modern scientific and ethical problems including abortion, genetic testing, genetically modified plants and animals, stem cells, gene therapy, research on humans, and physician-assisted suicide. Biology and biotechnology often confound our notions of right and wrong, and what ethical behavior is. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG-110 FILA general Education: philosophy or religion and ethical reasoning Offered alternate years

PHIL-320E Professional Ethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall and Spring

Pressing issues confronting professionals in a technological era. Utilizing the insights of philosophical and religious ethics, the course examines the responsibilities of the professional person in business, medicine, law education, the ministry, and other fields. Problems considered include confidentiality, accountability, whistleblowing, governmental regulation, and ethical codes. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350 and ENG 110 and junior or senior standing FILA general education: philosophy or religion and ethical reasoning

PHIL-340EW Environmental Ethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Fall Only

Examines the historical development of environmental ethics in the U.S., major ethical approaches to contemporary environmental issues, and the application of those theories to particular topics such as ecojustice, biodiversity, and global warming. Readings will be drawn from a wide range of sources, from ancient scripture to current news reports. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350; ENG-110; and one of the following courses: BIOL-100, BIOL-101, BIOL-110, CHEM-102 or CHEM-161 General Education: philosophy or religion, ethical reasoning and writing intensive

ENVR-234E Wildlife Ethics

Credits: 3 Term Offered: May Term

This course will explore the ethical implications of wildlife management, research and stewardship by applying ethical frameworks to issues surrounding wildlife. Possible topics include reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone and subsequent delisting, predator control, supplemental feeding, logging/wildlife conflicts, hunting culture, etc. Prerequisites: FILA-150 or FILA-350, ENG-110 and BIOL-100 or BIOL-110 FILA general education: ethical reasoning

ENVR-305 Natural Resource & Environmental Law

Credits: 3 Term Offered: Spring Only

This course will provide an overview of federal and state laws that are aimed at the conservation of natural resources and/or protection of environmental quality. Major laws that will be covered include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act and others. Speakers from natural resource/environmental agencies such as the Va. Department of Environmental Quality, Va. Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and U.S. Forest Service will provide practical insights into the application and implementation of environmental policy. Alternate years: offered 2018-2019 Prerequisites: BIOL-100, 101 or 110